The Abbey of Saint-Evroul is a former Benedictine abbey, today in ruins. Its name refers to its founder, Ebrulf (Evroul), who founded a hermitage in the forest of Ouche around 560. The abbey was rebuilt around 1000. Robert de Grantmesnil served as abbot of Saint-Evroul, which he helped restore in 1050. He had become a monk at Saint-Evroul before becoming its abbot. Orderic Vitalis entered the abbey as a young boy and later wrote a history of the abbey. Saint-Evroul was famed for its musical programme and eleven monks brought its musical traditions to the abbey of Sant'Eufemia (now part ot town of Lamezia Terme) in Calabria. The abbey was rebuilt again between 1231 and 1284. In 1628 it was closed and demolished finally in the early 1800s.

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Founded: c. 1000
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JOEL CARBONNIER (16 months ago)
Little known, it has an interesting history and deserves our attention. Then research on the net will complete our knowledge.
Benoît Nunez (2 years ago)
Very nice well maintained ruin with a small museum. There are also several explanatory panels surrounding the abbey. It's very photogenic, the tour is done in 5 minutes flat but you can easily get caught up in the atmosphere. Access is simple with a large car park, everything is done on foot. Very good for a family outing, picnic tables nearby.
Benoît Nunez (2 years ago)
Very nice well maintained ruin with a small museum. There are also several explanatory panels surrounding the abbey. It's very photogenic, the tour is done in 5 minutes flat but you can easily get caught up in the atmosphere. Access is simple with a large car park, everything is done on foot. Very good for a family outing, picnic tables nearby.
Mirko Frind (2 years ago)
Even if there isn't really much to see, this place immediately captivates you. For me a magical place with a lot of charm. Parking lot is actually in front of it and already in the first few minutes on the premises it casts a spell over you.
Mirko Frind (2 years ago)
Even if there isn't really much to see, this place immediately captivates you. For me a magical place with a lot of charm. Parking lot is actually in front of it and already in the first few minutes on the premises it casts a spell over you.
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