Sées Cathedral

Sées, France

Sées Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Sées) dates from the 13th and 14th century and occupies the site of three earlier churches. The west front, which is disfigured by the buttresses projecting beyond it, has two stately spires of open work 230 ft. high. The nave was built towards the end of the 13th century. The choir, built soon afterwards, is remarkable for the lightness of its construction. In the choir are four bas-reliefs of great beauty representing scenes in the life of the Virgin Mary; and the altar is adorned with another depicting the removal of the relics of Saints Gervais and Protais. The church has constantly been the object of restoration and reconstruction. It has an organ by Claude Parisot.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrian Dawson (2 years ago)
Beautiful historic french town with Cathedral , Palace and other historic buildings
kris batty (2 years ago)
Wonderful small town. Sleepy and majestic
Richard Gawronski (3 years ago)
Nice looking cathedral, locals are ignorant with a bad attitude towards tourists. Didn't stay long, didn't feel welcome
Brenda Worth (3 years ago)
A beautiful cathederal which did not disappoint. The stained glass windows were awesome as are the cathederals twin towers
Chance (3 years ago)
So beautiful. Took so many pictures. This was a lovely and gorgeous cathedrale. It was breath taking. I will enjoy all the pictures that I have taken for years that's for sure.
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