Bec Abbey (Abbaye Notre-Dame du Bec) was once the most influential abbey in the Anglo-Norman kingdom. The abbey was founded in 1034 by Herluin, a Norman knight who in about 1031 left the court of Gilbert, Count of Brionne, to devote himself to a life of religion: the commune of Le Bec Hellouin preserves his name. 136 monks made their profession while Herluin was in charge.

With the arrival of Lanfranc of Pavia, Bec became a focus of 11th century intellectual life. Lanfranc, who was already famous for his lectures at Avranches, came to teach as prior and master of the monastic school, but left in 1062, to become abbot of St. Stephen's Abbey, Caen, and later Archbishop of Canterbury. He was followed as abbot by Anselm, also later an Archbishop of Canterbury, as was the fifth abbot, Theobald of Bec. Many distinguished ecclesiastics, probably including the future Pope Alexander II and Saint Ivo of Chartres, were educated in the school at Bec.

The followers of William the Conqueror supported the abbey, enriching it with extensive properties in England. Bec also owned and managed St Neots Priory as well as a number of other British foundations, including Goldcliff Priory in Monmouthshire founded in 1113 by Robert de Chandos. The village of Tooting Bec, now a London suburb, is so named because the abbey owned the land.

Bec Abbey was damaged during the Wars of Religion and left a ruin in the French Revolution. The 15th century Tour Saint-Nicolas ('St, Nicholas's Tower') from the medieval monastery is still standing.

In 1948 the site was re-settled as the Abbaye de Notre-Dame du Bec by Olivetan monks led by Dom Grammont, who effected some restorations. The abbey is known for its links with Anglicanism and has been visited by successive archbishops of Canterbury. The abbey library contains the John Graham Bishop deposit of 5,000 works concerning Anglicanism. In modern day, the Abbey is best known for the pottery the monks produce.

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Details

Founded: 1034
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oscar Brouchot (2 years ago)
Un très belle endroit a visiter. Il est possible de faire une visite des lieux où simplement se promener tranquillement. Une boutique est disponible offrant de nombreux produits conçu par les moines.
Андрей Ганнесен (2 years ago)
One of my most favorite places in Normandy. I traveled here several times by bicycle from Evreux and it was so cool everytime. The abbey is a brilliant place, beautiful, calm and picturesque. Here you can find architecture, church, cows and souvenirs like Russian matreshka. So, it is cool especially in good sunny summer day
Alan Pembshaw (2 years ago)
A calm, serene place with an extensive abbey and a magniificent tower. It is in a beautiful setting enclosed by a lovely stone wall with a twin-towered entrance. Parts are still in use and part is being restored. Well worth visiting both the abbey and the village
Calum Stirling (4 years ago)
A quiet, but immaculately kept Abbey. The town is worth a look round too.
Del S (4 years ago)
Peaceful place to visit
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