Lisieux Cathedral

Lisieux, France

Lisieux Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Lisieux) is a former Roman Catholic cathedral, and a national monument of France. Built between 1170 and the middle of the 13th century through the initiative of Bishop Arnulf, the cathedral was the seat of the Bishop of Lisieux until the diocese of Lisieux was abolished under the Concordat of 1801 and merged into the Diocese of Bayeux.

The west front of the building consists of three portals surmounted by two towers. The south tower was built in the 16th century and at the top bears a 17th-century flèche. Buttresses were added to the south face in the 15th century. The cathedral survived World War II wholly intact.

An earlier cathedral is presumed to have existed since the 6th century, as there was a Bishop of Lisieux from that time, but nothing is known of the earlier edifice.

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Details

Founded: 1170
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rafael Braga (15 months ago)
Beautiful!
Ermanno Paleari (2 years ago)
Gothic cathedral #XII sec. and restauration not scientific in the XIXth century# light, subtility of architecture give spiritual ascesis and perception of the infinity with gregorian music in far acoustic wawes. Simply a rare sensation.
Ras Patidar (2 years ago)
Historical place to see.
Bodog Sergiu (2 years ago)
Really nice
Rev. Drew Gregory Olson (3 years ago)
Most underrated pilgrimage site in Lisieux. Parish frequented by the Martin family. Chapel where Saint Therese attended daily mass and where she received her little revelation and desire to gather the blood dripping from the base of the crucifix as sign of love to give to others. The high altar was donated entirely by her father, Saint Louis Martin, who was quoted as stating that he had given his daughters to the Church and now, lacking a son, he at least was able to give an altar. He was also quoted as responding to a priest who said, "now we have the altar, a priest, all we lack is the victim (speaking about the Eucharist)" and Saint Louis Martin said, I am that victim. This was just three months before his health began to severely decline.
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