In 1494 Louis Picart, magistrate of Troyes and Tournaisis, friend and chamberlain of King Louis XII with whom he went to Italy, undertook the construction of the Château d'Ételan. It was built on the site of a fortress which has been destroyed under the order of Louis XI. Of the medieval construction, only the cellar, the castle wall and the guard house dating from 1350 remain.

The castle was later converted to a 15th-century flamboyant gothic mansion. The building consists of two dwellings built from layers of bricks and stones and joined together by a magnificent stone staircase dating from the first Renaissance. As integral part of the main building, the Chapel, dedicated to Mary Magdalene, include stained glass windows, wall paintings and statues which characterised the first Norman Renaissance.

History or legend tells us that several kings and famous people have spent time at Ételan like Louis XI, Frans I, Catherine de' Medici, Charles IX with the future kings Henry III and Henry IV and later Voltaire (1723–1724).

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Founded: 1494
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jarred Baigent (2 years ago)
Amazing history and architecture
Margarete Hartert (2 years ago)
Das Schloss mit den markanten Ziegelsteinstreifen wurde 1494 anstelle einer Festung errichtet, die auf Befehl Ludiwgs XI. zerstört worden war. Von dem mittelalterlichen Gebäude sind noch Keller, Burgmauer und Wachhaus erhalten. Das Schloss besteht aus zwei Gebäuden, sie sind durch eine prächtige Renaissance-Steintreppe verbunden. Die Kapelle ist Maria Magdalena gewidmet und besitzt Glasfenster, Wandmalereien und Statuen aus der Renaissance. Führungen für Einzelgäste und Gruppen sind möglich.
Camille Clement (2 years ago)
We were delighted to discover this gorgeous, privately-owned chateau, tucked away in the countryside. The owner Marc is ever so friendly and passionate about the property. He gave us a very enthusiastic tour. We particularly enjoyed being able to walk around the grounds on our own. There are three loops of varying distances, for people to meander in the Chateau's park.
Natalya Guzenko Boudier (2 years ago)
The château's architecture is so unique! The chapel is a gemstone. And the view from the château is amazing!
Julien Planté (2 years ago)
Constructed in a flamboyant Gothic style, the Château d'Ételan is a wonder of Normandie. The best stop you can make between Rouen and Le Havre.
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