Bernay Abbey Church

Bernay, France

Bernay Abbey (Notre-Dame de Bernay) was established in the first decade of the 11th century by Judith of Brittany who devoted part of the marriage settlement from her husband, Richard II, Duke of Normandy, to its construction. The latter entrusted the completion of the abbey to the Italian, William of Volpiano (died 1028), who reformed the monastery of Fécamp to which he had been called in 1001. After a period of delay in the work, the completion was made by Vital of Creully (appointed in c. 1060, died 1082), the first abbot of the abbey.

The apse was rebuilt in Gothic style in the 15th century and new west facade was added in the 17th century. During the Revolution the church was badly damaged and partially destroyed. The restoration began in 1963.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

linnea smedler (9 months ago)
Très joli
Indeewara Jayawardane (9 months ago)
An absolute gem.
Marie Roquefort (10 months ago)
Très jolie bâtisse. Extraordinaire pour les concerts ou expositions
Cécile Francois (11 months ago)
Lieu magnifique mais belle arnaque car si en effet elle est monument historique (gratuite), pour y accéder il faut demander la clé au musée des Beaux-Arts, et donc payer un billet couplé avec le musée (pour lequel on est pas forcément intéressé, comme c'était mon cas). De plus pas d'information sur son histoire avant la révolution. Bien dommage de finir la visite de cette jolie ville ainsi
Sylvie Barre (18 months ago)
Très beau lieu profane. Froid l'hiver mais l'été super agréable à visiter quand il fait chaud
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château de Chaumont

The Château de Chaumont was founded in the 10th century by Odo I, Count of Blois. The purpose was to protect his lands from attacks from his feudal rivals, Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou. On his behalf the Norman Gelduin received it, improved it and held it as his own. His great-niece Denise de Fougère, having married Sulpice d'Amboise, passed the château into the Amboise family for five centuries.

Pierre d'Amboise unsuccessfully rebelled against King Louis XI and his property was confiscated, and the castle was dismantled on royal order in 1465. It was later rebuilt by Charles I d'Amboise from 1465–1475 and then finished by his son, Charles II d'Amboise de Chaumont from 1498–1510, with help from his uncle, Cardinal Georges d'Amboise; some Renaissance features were to be seen in buildings that retained their overall medieval appearance. The château was acquired by Catherine de Medici in 1550. There she entertained numerous astrologers, among them Nostradamus. When her husband, Henry II, died in 1559 she forced his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, to exchange Château de Chaumont for Château de Chenonceau which Henry had given to de Poitiers. Diane de Poitiers only lived at Chaumont for a short while.

Later Chaumont has changed hands several times. Paul de Beauvilliers bought the château in 1699, modernized some of its interiors and decorated it with sufficient grandeur to house the duc d'Anjou on his way to become king of Spain in 1700. Monsieur Bertin demolished the north wing to open the house towards the river view in the modern fashion.

In 1750, Jacques-Donatien Le Ray purchased the castle as a country home where he established a glassmaking and pottery factory. He was considered the French "Father of the American Revolution" because he loved America. However, in 1789, the new French Revolutionary Government seized Le Ray's assets, including his beloved Château de Chaumont.

The castle has been classified as a Monument historique since 1840 by the French Ministry of Culture. The Château de Chaumont is currently a museum and every year hosts a Garden Festival from April to October where contemporary garden designers display their work in an English-style garden.