In 1692 the naval Battle of La Hougue took place between the English and the French close to the island of Tatihou. The so-called Vauban Tower (Tour Vauban de Tatihou) was built in 1694. In 1756 the surroundings of La Hougue were defended by many batteries and forts, but the lack of regular maintenance ensured that these quickly fell into disrepair. In 1720 Tatihou was used for quarantining plague victims from Marseilles.

Vauban Tower is part of the UNESCO World Heritage site of Vauban Fortifications around the France.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Tatihou, France
See all sites in Tatihou

Details

Founded: 1694
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ludo lemaire (13 months ago)
Je l'ai fait avec mon ecole super beau et refaire
agnes moreno (14 months ago)
Magnificent island and tropical plants galore. One regret that the place where we buy the tickets is so far from the departure of the boat. A desire to return
Emma Duv (15 months ago)
A superb island, a magnificent landscape, superb seashells, what more could you ask for? =) Small sad note, a corpse of nutria left in front of the fort = (
lil ricoh (2 years ago)
Nice place for a walk
Jorge Martin (3 years ago)
Very nice visit and sorroundings
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.