Saint Germain's Chapel

Querqueville, France

The Chapel of Saint Germanus (Chapelle Saint-Germain) is one of the earliest surviving places of Christian worship in the Cotentin Peninsula. It is a small building with walls built from small pieces of shale arranged in a herringbone pattern. The chapel consists of a short nave, and transepts and a choir each formed from an identical apse with half domed roofs. This tri-lobate plan, which is unusual, is the result of a reconstruction in the 9th or 10th century on remains of a palaeo-Christian basilica which has been revealed by archaeological excavations. In the 17th century, the chapel was topped by a tower which in turn replaced an older tower structure.

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Details

Founded: 800-900 AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Poum Poum (4 years ago)
beau site
Poum Poum (4 years ago)
beautiful site
Conrad Egbert (4 years ago)
Conrad Egbert (4 years ago)
Éric Doré (7 years ago)
Un très beau cimetière avec une vue magnifique
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