Manoir de Vauville

Vauville, France

The manor of Vauville was originally built as a fortress in 1163 by Richard de Vauville who participated in the Conquest of England with William the Conqueror. The current château was built in the 1650s. It has been in the same family since 1890. The garden was created in the moat in 1947 by the parents of the present owners, who had a particular interest in exotic plants. Since 1980 the garden has grown from two to eight hectares. Reflecting pools where created, the banks restored, hedges to protect against the wind were integrated to give coherence to the garden. The current owners continue to collect unusual plants from all over the world. The on-going development and maintenance of such a garden only 300 yards from the sea with direct exposure to sand, wind, salt, and difficult weather, is a very challenging project.

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Address

D318, Vauville, France
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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Kiefer (3 years ago)
Besuch lohnt sich.
Le Puil Alain (3 years ago)
Beau
Daniel Bodenhöfer (4 years ago)
Romantischer Ort mit Steinbrücke über dem Bach, einem romantischen Chateau (Botanischer Garten davon kann besichtigt werden), einer wunderschönen Küste, umgeben von grüner Hügellandschaft. Einfach wunderschön. Leider kein Bäcker, nur ein Pup.
Olivier Tourchon (5 years ago)
Visite vraiment surprenante et agréable d'un jardin d'excellence entretenu avec énormément de soin !
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