The Broch of Clickimin is a large and well preserved, though somewhat restored broch near Lerwick. Originally built on an island in Clickimin Loch (now increased in size by silting and drainage), it was approached by a stone causeway. The water-level in the loch was reduced in 1874, leaving the broch high and dry. The broch is situated within a walled enclosure and, unusually for brochs, features a large 'blockhouse' between the opening in the enclosure and the broch itself. Another unusual feature is a stone slab featuring sculptured footprints, located in the causeway which approached the site. Situated across the loch is the Clickimin Leisure Centre. The site is maintained by Historic Scotland.

According to its excavator Hamilton there were several periods of occupation of the site: Late Bronze Age farmstead, Early Iron Age farmstead, Iron Age fort period one (wall/blockhouse), Iron Age fort period two (plugging of the main entrance or landing stage), broch period, early wheelhouse settlement (inside the broch), late wheelhouse settlement (outside the broch). In 1989 Noel Fojut argued that Hamilton's schema was overcomplicated.

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