The Manoir de Villers was built between courtyard and garden in 1581. A 'Master House' was made of local stone, with a half-timbered storey covered with small tiles. It was transformed and extended through centuries, to become this great manor in neo-Norman style, with the roofing inspired from the best houses of Rouen, and façade dressed up with a strange 'trompe l'oeil'. Welcomed in the house, the visitor is invited to a walk through out furnitured and inhabited rooms.They discover, guided by the owners and through the family furniture, how the french way of life, which expressed itself through Decorative Art, is tied to History.

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Founded: 1581
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Guinchard (2 years ago)
Very nice mansion, nice and super quiet setting
Alix Mery (2 years ago)
Fairytale place. Excellent welcome by the chatelains themselves. Breathtaking view of the Seine. Moment out of time, relaxing thanks to the hundred-year-old lime trees. Simply magical
Isaac Katz (3 years ago)
Amazing place to stay. The pictures don't do it justice. Very nice old couple take care of you. Highly recommended.
Valerie Anger (3 years ago)
A warm welcome A guided tour with passion. A leap in history. Wonderful thanks to the owners for allowing us to share the space of a visit to their past and present. Enthusiastic.
Aurélien Pinjon (4 years ago)
Troisième séjour au manoir, domaine toujours aussi beaux et propre. Cependant déçu de cette nouvelle chambre. Aucune climatisation, nous avons eu très chaud. Celle-ci se trouvait sous les toits.
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