Château de Rouen

Rouen, France

Château de Rouen was a castle built by Philip II of France from 1204 to 1210 following his capture of the duchy from John, duke of Normandy and king of England. Located outside the medieval town to its north, in a dominant position, it played a military role in the Hundred Years' War and the Wars of Religion. It was the main seat of power, administration and politics in the duchy of Normandy for nearly 400 years.

It was here that Joan of Arc was imprisoned in December 1430 and tried from 21 February to 23 May 1431. Vulnerable to artillery like other medieval fortresses, all but the keep (now known as the Tour Jeanne d'Arc) was dismantled in 1591 by Henry IV of France. The pointed roof of the keep was added in restoration works beginning in the 1870s. During the Second World War the tower was camouflaged and turned into a bunker by the occupying German forces. It is now open to the public.

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Address

Rue du Donjon 2, Rouen, France
See all sites in Rouen

Details

Founded: 1204-1210
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maha Jabir (7 months ago)
It's a good place
Gary Galante (12 months ago)
Simply a medieval tower of a castle where Saint Joan of Arc was once imprisoned. Really moving site.
Daniel Russell (12 months ago)
Unfortunately closed when I arrived, but impressive tower.
Николай Кияшкин (18 months ago)
Not fantastic as I want
Daniel Yoo (2 years ago)
They only open the tour for the weekdays. The weekend is only for Escape game... :////
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