The Bon-Repos Abbey was founded by Viscount Alain III de Rohan in c. 1184. According to legend, he was asked to build it by the Virgin Mary; she appeared to him in a dream when he fell asleep on this spot after a hard day’s hunting in the Quénécan Forest. After a tumultuous history, which included being burnt down by the Chouans (Royalists) in 1795, the abbey fell into ruin until it was rescued in 1986 by the local community who founded the Association of Friends of Bon Repos Abbey. Thanks to the association, part of the abbey has been restored although the main body is an empty shell. Nowadays the abbey is devoted to nurturing contemporary art by having artists in residence and holding regular exhibitions.

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Address

D44, Saint-Gelven, France
See all sites in Saint-Gelven

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.brittanytourism.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paula Turner (2 years ago)
Fab show we really enjoyed it and not expensive
Paul Blencowe (2 years ago)
wonderful location, well worth a visit if your in the area
Maria Richardson (2 years ago)
Beautiful location. You can wander around the grounds with your dog.
Graham Townsend (2 years ago)
Lovely restful location. Very helpful staff. Guided tour by iPad very comprehensive.
Paul Dunford (2 years ago)
Great artwork (displays vary) and a very good ipad-based self tour in English (and French of course). Very nice restaurant just over the bridge. Doesn't look much but really nice food and a lovely view of the river and Abbey.
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