Château de Pontivy

Pontivy, France

According to legend, Pontivy was founded in 685 AD by an English monk called Ivy who built a wooden bridge across the Blavet, giving the town its name – Pont d’Ivy. The town really began to develop in the 12th century when Viscount Rohan settled there and in the 14th century it became the political and administrative capital of the viscounty.

The main site in Pontivy is its château, which overlooks the River Blavet a short walk from the town centre. The present castle was built in 1485 by Viscount Rohan, whose aristocratic line dates back to 1120. The Rohan family seat has seen plenty of action during its 500-year history including being besieged during the Duchy of Brittany War of Independence in 1488 and taken over by Catholic forces during the French Wars of Religion in 1589. The château, which retains many original features, is open to the public and often stages art exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 1485
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.brittanytourism.com

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ayhan Yavuz (14 months ago)
Beautiful
Jeremy Eveno (15 months ago)
Il est très joli et c'est une belle petite balade au tour
Sue Ward (2 years ago)
It's shut
Chris lees (2 years ago)
Superb looking castle but closed on our visit. Sad really.
Ian Pinfold (3 years ago)
Outside looks fascinating. Inside closed.
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