Fort-la-Latte or Castle of La Latte was built on a small piece of land at the Baie de la Fresnaye in the 14th century. In 1379 it was conquered by Bertrand du Guesclin. It was besieged by the English in 1490 and by the holy League in 1597. Garangeau under the reign of Louis XIV turned the castle into a fortress, using Vauban's building plans. They used canon batteries, stationed in Fort La Latte, to defend Saint-Malo against English and Dutch attacks. In the year 1793, a melting furnace for cannon balls was built and some counter-revolutionary suspects were imprisoned at Fort la Latte. The last attack happened in 1815 during the Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) (also known as the Waterloo Campaign, it describes Napoleons return to power between 20 March 1815 to 28 June 1815), when a few men from Saint-Malo unsuccessfully attacked the castle.

Various films have been shot at this site. Today Fort-la-Latte is a famous tourist attraction.

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Address

La Latte, Plévenon, France
See all sites in Plévenon

Details

Founded: 1340
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Carpenter (2 years ago)
Historical fort in marvellous location comanding great views over the sea and inlets. Has been lovingly restored by owners and looks good. The fort is a 600m (8min) walk down a gravel track from the car park. Note that opening times vary by month of the year.
Andy miller (2 years ago)
Brilliant place thoroughly enjoyed the visit it was great to see information in English. A well restored fort that gives a great insight to how it must have been years ago and.dog friendly
Milena .Kusnierova (2 years ago)
Another beautiful place. I was just sitting there and watching the beautyaround me.
Susie Flude (2 years ago)
Really enjoyed our visit. The fort is a five minute walk from the car park, down a stony track. The fort is really impressive to see on the approach. There is lots to see: plenty of places to investigate and climb up. The tower gives stunning views of the surrounding sea and land. You can even climb even higher, up a slightly tricky staircase to the top of a roof. In all, well worth the trip.
Bart Van den Bosch (2 years ago)
Very nice and well maintained fort. It is still inhabited and is very cozy. Does not have a harsh military ring to it, but is more a fortified house with a walled garden. It holds a commanding view of the surrounding sea and was apparently used to enforce customs controls.
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