Fort-la-Latte or Castle of La Latte was built on a small piece of land at the Baie de la Fresnaye in the 14th century. In 1379 it was conquered by Bertrand du Guesclin. It was besieged by the English in 1490 and by the holy League in 1597. Garangeau under the reign of Louis XIV turned the castle into a fortress, using Vauban's building plans. They used canon batteries, stationed in Fort La Latte, to defend Saint-Malo against English and Dutch attacks. In the year 1793, a melting furnace for cannon balls was built and some counter-revolutionary suspects were imprisoned at Fort la Latte. The last attack happened in 1815 during the Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) (also known as the Waterloo Campaign, it describes Napoleons return to power between 20 March 1815 to 28 June 1815), when a few men from Saint-Malo unsuccessfully attacked the castle.

Various films have been shot at this site. Today Fort-la-Latte is a famous tourist attraction.

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Address

La Latte, Plévenon, France
See all sites in Plévenon

Details

Founded: 1340
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giles Carey (5 months ago)
It was closed on our visit due to covid, we had a lovely walk along the coast and got to see the fort from an angle we probably would have missed if it was open. Nice day out, muddy paths ;)
Keith Logan (9 months ago)
Where the film "the vikings " was made with Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis, remember them? A bit of a walk down and back up from the car park but well worth it. Kids will love it. Very well preserved and not too big. Amazing location and views over the sea. You can even climb to the top of the tower and onto the roof where the final fight scene was shot if you have a head for heights.
Susan Jones (10 months ago)
Charged full price would not let us have reduced rate even though we are over 70. Difficult walk need more rest places. Particularly uphill walk back.
Caillou Mertens (11 months ago)
Trail from Cap Frehel to Ford la Latte through GR34 fantastico
Steven Dickinson (16 months ago)
Fantastic piece of History. Great setting. Reasonable entrance costs. The whole family enjoyed it.
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