Fort-la-Latte or Castle of La Latte was built on a small piece of land at the Baie de la Fresnaye in the 14th century. In 1379 it was conquered by Bertrand du Guesclin. It was besieged by the English in 1490 and by the holy League in 1597. Garangeau under the reign of Louis XIV turned the castle into a fortress, using Vauban's building plans. They used canon batteries, stationed in Fort La Latte, to defend Saint-Malo against English and Dutch attacks. In the year 1793, a melting furnace for cannon balls was built and some counter-revolutionary suspects were imprisoned at Fort la Latte. The last attack happened in 1815 during the Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) (also known as the Waterloo Campaign, it describes Napoleons return to power between 20 March 1815 to 28 June 1815), when a few men from Saint-Malo unsuccessfully attacked the castle.

Various films have been shot at this site. Today Fort-la-Latte is a famous tourist attraction.

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Address

La Latte, Plévenon, France
See all sites in Plévenon

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Trevor Cook (34 days ago)
Really beautiful place to visit the views are amazing
Tom Hardy (8 months ago)
Well worth a visit. Long walk to the actual venue from the car park. Although a small vehicle was available for certain people. Fascinating place with great location and history. Not allowed picnics... But we had a bag of crisps in a small field before the castle. Dogs welcome which was pretty good, unless your dog is massive and hates other dogs.
Philippe G. (8 months ago)
Lovely fortress by the sea. Amazingly refurbished by private owners since 1930. Definitely worth a visit after a lovely walk by the coast!
Roelof (10 months ago)
Interesting castle/fort, with lots to see!
Giles Carey (15 months ago)
It was closed on our visit due to covid, we had a lovely walk along the coast and got to see the fort from an angle we probably would have missed if it was open. Nice day out, muddy paths ;)
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