Saint-Malo Cathedral

Saint-Malo, France

Saint-Malo Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Vincent-de-Saragosse de Saint-Malo) is a Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to Saint Vincent of Saragossa. It was formerly the seat of the Bishop of Saint-Malo. The cathedral was built in 1146 when Jean de Châtillon, Bishop of Aleth, transferred his bishopric to the growing town of Saint-Malo on a more secure site across the river. The Benedictine monastery of Saint Malo, founded in 1108, became the home of the bishopric and its church the new cathedral, replacing Aleth Cathedral.

Saint-Malo Cathedral has undergone several transformations so you will see Romanesque, Gothic, High Gothic and Renaissance styles. However, in 1944 during a battle for the city the cathedral was bombed and the choir section collapsed. It took over 20 years to make the repairs.

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Details

Founded: 1146
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shaunas Adventures (3 years ago)
Love the sound of the bells that ring from here that vibrate through the city. It is quite the extraordinary experience if you manage to be inside the cathedral when the bells start to ring. Amazing!
Matthias H (3 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral, nice windows and silent
Bart Van den Bosch (3 years ago)
Not too great as cathedrals go but the (modern) glass windows are quite nice.
Jane White (3 years ago)
Rainy day, got very wet. The rain pouring from the roof was awesome.
Dave O'Brien (3 years ago)
Nice cathedral.. it has been extensively rebuilt like a lot of StMalo but still retains atmosphere and a sense of age
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