Saint-Malo Cathedral

Saint-Malo, France

Saint-Malo Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Vincent-de-Saragosse de Saint-Malo) is a Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to Saint Vincent of Saragossa. It was formerly the seat of the Bishop of Saint-Malo. The cathedral was built in 1146 when Jean de Châtillon, Bishop of Aleth, transferred his bishopric to the growing town of Saint-Malo on a more secure site across the river. The Benedictine monastery of Saint Malo, founded in 1108, became the home of the bishopric and its church the new cathedral, replacing Aleth Cathedral.

Saint-Malo Cathedral has undergone several transformations so you will see Romanesque, Gothic, High Gothic and Renaissance styles. However, in 1944 during a battle for the city the cathedral was bombed and the choir section collapsed. It took over 20 years to make the repairs.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1146
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shaunas Adventures (2 years ago)
Love the sound of the bells that ring from here that vibrate through the city. It is quite the extraordinary experience if you manage to be inside the cathedral when the bells start to ring. Amazing!
Matthias H (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral, nice windows and silent
Bart Van den Bosch (2 years ago)
Not too great as cathedrals go but the (modern) glass windows are quite nice.
Jane White (2 years ago)
Rainy day, got very wet. The rain pouring from the roof was awesome.
Dave O'Brien (2 years ago)
Nice cathedral.. it has been extensively rebuilt like a lot of StMalo but still retains atmosphere and a sense of age
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Ängsö Castle

Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.