Château de Saint-Malo

Saint-Malo, France

Château de Saint-Malo was built between 1424 and 1690, first by Jean V, the Duke of Brittany. The Duke Francois II built the first tower in 1475. In 1590 during the Wars of Religion the castle was occupied by local people, who wanted to prevent local governor to gave the city to Protestant king Henry IV.

The château was modified in the 17th century according the design of famous fortress architect Sebastian Vauban. In the 19th century it functioned as barracks. Today it is a museum, covering a number of themes including the long maritime history of St-Malo, 19th century writers of which Chateaubriand is the most well known, WWII occupation and the destruction and reconstruction of the town.

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Founded: 1424
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Max Pain (3 years ago)
Nice place to stay if you travelling by car. - Hotel restaurant was closed for 2 days... Staff (it’s actually same lady who doing everything - reception, helping with luggage, cooking, serving...) not really great and willing to make you stay pleasant..
Sasha Turilin (3 years ago)
Nice and cheese old castle, good restaurant, really quiet, I can recommend it
Russell Newton (4 years ago)
Hard to find. I tried two SatNav and both had trouble. Was frustrating start to my visit after a long drive. Rooms are nice good size and comfortable. Dinner was decent but slightly expensive.
Matthew Fister (4 years ago)
We had a great time!! Nice and cozy, quiet and well appointed! We spent one night in late March. Ate dinner at the restaurant and it was superb!! Wish we could have stayed a weekend!
Ron Underwood (8 years ago)
Nice place. Rooms very nice. Stayed in 104. Owners and/or staff were great. Very easy from st. Malo by car. Very close. I would stay here again.
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