St. Nicolai Church

Vejle, Denmark

St. Nicolai Church dates to the 13th century. Originally built in late Romanesque style and dedicated to the patron saint of merchants and seafarers, the church is the oldest building in the community. Renovations in the 15th century developed the church into a Gothic hall with two transepts and a tower 27.2 m high.

On display in a glass-covered sarcophagus in the northern transept are the remains of the Haraldskær Woman, one of the best conserved of the iron age bog bodies. The southern transept houses the sarcophagi of Kai de la Mare and his wife. The exterior brick wall of the north transept has an interesting feature of 23 spherical indentations approximately 15 cm in diameter, which hold the skulls of 23 robbers who were caught and beheaded in the nearby Nørreskov forest. In front of the church stands a sculpture of the priest Anders Sørensen Vedel.

The church was seriously damaged during the Thirty Years' War by the Catholic troops of Wallenstein. Since that time it has undergone several major restorations: in 1744, 1855-56, 1887-88 and 1964-66.

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Address

Kirketorvet 1, Vejle, Denmark
See all sites in Vejle

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Sosniecki (12 months ago)
A Catholic church which was later reformed, but not for the better. As a background for the altar hangs a modern painting which with a little good humanistic will can be interpreted into a Christian understanding. Jesus Christ is banished to hang on a side pillar where He is not so conspicuous. Seen with modern glasses a beautiful church. The church advertises with free WIFI, but it has nothing on it.
Ole Kjeldsen (14 months ago)
Could not hear what the pastor said bad sound
kURT ANDERSEN (3 years ago)
Ok
kURT ANDERSEN (3 years ago)
Ok
Johnny Nielsen (3 years ago)
Really a nice renovation they got done in church
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