Château de Keriolet

Concarneau, France

Keriolet manor dates back to the 15th century. It was redesigned in the 19th century by princess Zénaïde Narischkine Youssoupoff, the aunt of Russian Tsar Nikolai II, for her young spouse, the Count of Chauveau in Concarneau, a commoner for whom she purchased two noble titles. Extremely fond of the region, the princess"s design uses numerous symbols to represent Breton history and tradition (Breton couples in traditional dress, stoat"s paws, Breton nationalist symbols, etc).

During the 20th century, the Château de Keriolet belonged to several different owners, including the princess’s grandson, Felix Yusupov, who was famous for his role in the assassination of Rasputin. Since 1988, the Château has been wonderfully restored. Nowadays the site hosts some top electronic music events.

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Details

Founded: 19th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eoin McLean (2 years ago)
Beautiful Chateau and gardens. There is also a small playground to the right of the chateau, through the woods. Be aware though, the chateau is privately owned and keeps its own opening hours. So check before you travel
Fun Time (2 years ago)
A good place to visit woth good perosns
Vicki Lawrence (2 years ago)
Unfortunately I can't leave any more than one star because after driving 90 minutes to get there it was closed. This was on a Saturday in August during the school holidays. Unfortunately we did not have good internet connection to check opening times in advance but thought being a Saturday in August we would have been okay. Very disappointing indeed.
Eva Wittwer (2 years ago)
Fun place to visit, peculiar history and architecture. We had a fun guide (included in entrancefee) that shared lots of funfacts. The current owner still lives on property as hes restoring the castle, so do his dogs that love to welcome the tours. Incredible kitchen. Would recommend.
Adrian Roos (2 years ago)
Lovely restored cheateau with a beautiful kitchen. Worth the visit!
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