Château de Keriolet

Concarneau, France

Keriolet manor dates back to the 15th century. It was redesigned in the 19th century by princess Zénaïde Narischkine Youssoupoff, the aunt of Russian Tsar Nikolai II, for her young spouse, the Count of Chauveau in Concarneau, a commoner for whom she purchased two noble titles. Extremely fond of the region, the princess"s design uses numerous symbols to represent Breton history and tradition (Breton couples in traditional dress, stoat"s paws, Breton nationalist symbols, etc).

During the 20th century, the Château de Keriolet belonged to several different owners, including the princess’s grandson, Felix Yusupov, who was famous for his role in the assassination of Rasputin. Since 1988, the Château has been wonderfully restored. Nowadays the site hosts some top electronic music events.

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Founded: 19th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mirjam Out (10 months ago)
Really beautiful castle to visit. The guided tour is the best thing to do here, it is only 7 euros for an adult and parking is free. The guide talks in French, but you can ask questions in English as well. They also hand out texts in other languages so everyone can follow the tour and get all the information. The guide we had was quite young, but did a really good job of telling everything about the castle. Highly recommend if you are in the area!
Margarita Alekseeva (12 months ago)
It s too beautiful! Castle of Russian imperial princess Zinaida Narisckine 19th century
Sarah (2 years ago)
Highly recommended. A beautiful château, in a Gothic style, with a fascinating history. Helpful staff who were very kind when I tried to speak French. We were given a written guide in English and I did my best to understand a little of the French tour.
Richard Black (2 years ago)
Fantastic little chateau, off the beaten track. All tours are guided and mostly in french, however you do get a booklet in English to follow along with. It's privately owned and undergoing constant restoration. Really interesting history. Loads of parking, and only €6.50 for adult entry. Bargain.
Bryn Williams-Jones (2 years ago)
Quirky castle with lots of different styles of architecture. Affordable, fantastic guided tour (all visits are guided) that made what might otherwise have been confusing an informative and entertaining visit. But not for young kids because not interactive - “Dad, its boring!”
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The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

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