Gyldenholm Manor

Slagelse, Denmark

The history of the Gyldenholm estate dates back to 1774, when Antvorskov Ryttergods was sold on auction. Anders Dinesen acquired two parcels, Gimlinge and Lystager, and constructed a new manor house which was named Gyldenholm. In 1800, the estate was sold by Anders Dinesen's son and over the following decades it changed hands several times. In 1862 Gyldenholm was acquired by Charles Adolph Denis de Neergaard, who already owned Castrup and Charlottedal Manors in the area. The property has stayed in the de Neergaard family ever since.

The current building was built in 1864 to a Historicist design by Johan Daniel Herholdt. It consists of two storys over a celler and is built in red brick with decorative details in yellow brick. There is a crenellated tower on the main facade. The interior is decorated by Georg Hilker and Constantin Hansen.

Gyldenholm covers 1,231 hectares of which approximately 500 hectares consist of agricultural land and 700 hectares of forest. Apart from agriculture and forestry, the estate derrives its revenue from house rental and hunting rights. The main building is rented out for minor conferences, parties and other events.

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Founded: 1863-1864
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark

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