Dragsholm Castle

Hørve, Denmark

Dragsholm Castle is one of the oldest secular buildings in Denmark. The original castle was built around 1215 by the Bishop of Roskilde. During the Middle Ages, the building was modified from the original palace to a fortified castle. During the Count's Feud (1534–36) it was so strong that it was the only castle on Zealand to withstand the armies of Count Christoffer.

In connection with the Reformation, Dragsholm was passed on to the Crown. As Crownland during the period from 1536 to 1664, Dragsholm Castle was used as a prison for noble and ecclesiastical prisoners. In the large tower at the northeast corner of the medieval castle, prison cells were made and equipped with toilets and windows depending on the prisoner’s crimes, behaviour and the seriousness of his insults towards the King.

During the wars against Charles X Gustav of Sweden, an attempt was made to blow up Dragsholm Castle, and the place was a ruin until the King as part payment of his outstanding debts gave the castle to the grocer Heinrich Müller, and he started the restoration.

In 1694, Dragsholm Castle was sold to the nobleman Frederik Christian Adeler and finally rebuilt as the baroque castle we see today. Several owners from that family have made a lasting imprint on the development, including G. F. O. Zytphen Adeler, who took the initiative to drain the Lammefjord. The family line became extinct in 1932, and Dragsholm Castle passed over to the Central Land Board which sold the place to J.F. Bøttger, but only with the land belonging to the main estate.

Today, the baroque style of the castle still remains intact, but the interior of the Castle has been subject to restorations and modernisations over the years. The most recent major restoration took place after the first world war, where the Baron aimed for a Late Romantic Style, which still prevails in the salons and ballrooms.

In recent years, the Bøttger family has managed the running of the castle after a number of minor restorations, which in addition to general conservation of the building has had the purpose of raising the level of quality of the castle as a hotel, restaurant and attraction. The hotel rooms at the castle have been refurbished and modernised, and more rooms have been added in the porter’s lodge on the other side of the moat.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Vang Madsen (6 months ago)
Virkelig en god oplevelse at spise her. De varmeste anbefalinger herfra.
Jonas Mathiesen (7 months ago)
We had snacks and 7 dishes in the ‘eatery’. Snacks besides the no longer crisp pork rind were a good, savory start. Oyster dish, local game ravioli, beef, sausage and desert were excellent. Squid and cod did not work at all. Service was kind but often mentally away. Public transportation and taxi availability to the location sucks, and the hotel does not provide a shuttle service.
Lasse Hjorth Madsen (8 months ago)
Great historic place. Wonderful restaurant (gourmet-style)
Henrik Freeman Johansson (10 months ago)
Love this place! Very cozy, and very nice crew! We always have a coffee and carrot cake when we're in the area! Highly recommended!
karim takeznount (11 months ago)
Very interesting site. Restaurant looks good but I have not try. Rooms looks great but I did not try neither. The castle is a nice place to stay for a drink or a walk inside and outside by the marvellous gardens.
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