Munch Museum

Oslo, Norway

Munch Museum (Munch-museet) is an art museum dedicated to the life and works of the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. The museum was financed from the profits generated by the Oslo municipal cinemas and opened its doors in 1963 to commemorate what would have been Munch's 100th birthday. Its collection consists of works and articles by Munch, which he donated to the municipality of Oslo upon his death, and additional works donated by his sister Inger Munch, as well as various other works obtained through trades of duplicate prints, etc.

The museum now has in its permanent collection well over half of the artist's entire production of paintings and at least one copy of all his prints. This amounts to over 1,200 paintings, 18,000 prints, six sculptures, as well as 500 plates, 2,240 books, and various other items. The museum also contains educational and conservation sections and also has facilities for performing arts.

The museum structure was designed by the architects Einar Myklebust and Gunnar Fougner (1911-1995). Myklebust also played an important role in the expansion and renovation of the museum in 1994 for the 50th anniversary of Munch's death. The new museum will probably be completed in 2017 by the Spanish studio Herreros Arquitectos.

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Address

Finnmarkgata, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1963
Category: Museums in Norway

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Athanassios Protopapas (19 months ago)
Pros: Well thought-out activities for children (painting and puzzles); attractive store. Cons: Small; not just Munch; the scream is not here.
Leslie Cope (19 months ago)
In 2016 this museum had one of the most beautiful exhibits I've ever seen - Mapplethorpe + Munch. The similarities and points of interest between the two artists were artistically and professionally displayed. I haven't been back since but would definitely revisit!
Enda McMahon (19 months ago)
Would avoid a visit in its current state. It’s undergoing renovations with a new museum opening in 2020. For now all of Münch’s famous works have been moved to the national gallery. Go there instead!
Andrea Hardy (2 years ago)
There was an interactive puzzle game for children to help keep them interested in the artwork. It could have been a little clearer on how to store your bags before going through. It was obvious you couldn't have them, bit there are lockers and restrooms in the downstairs.
Zia (2 years ago)
It’s a small museum but has Munch’s significant works. We saw a joint exhibition curated by painter Marlene Dumas which showcased her admiration of Munch. The exhibition was well worth it. The gift shop is small but has some nice items. We didn’t try the cafe. The surrounding parks and neighborhoods are worth checking out.
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