Hamar Cathedral

Hamar, Norway

Hamar Cathedral was erected as a result of Hamar achieving city status in 1849 and re-emerged as an independent diocese two years later. Noting rapid growth and the need for a diocese to cover areas of eastern Norway, the Church of Norway established the seat for the newly formed diocese of Norway in Hamar in 1864. The architect for the cathedral was Heinrich Ernst Schirmer, the local general contractor was Herman Frang. The cathedral was consecrated for services on 15 December 1866. The exterior was built in simple, nearly austere German Romanesque style and is largely unchanged since its construction.

In the 1920s, several changes were made to the interior. In 1950, bishop Kristian Schjelderup called for a significant renovation of the interior. Arnstein Arneberg was commissioned as architect, and his design called for nearly completely gutting the interior. All that remain from the original interior are the supporting structure for the organ loft, only the baptismal font and two silver candlestick holders. The new interior was opened on May 9, 1954.

The interior is characterized by an elevated nave, inspired by the basilica structure. The windows are decorated with fabric-like paintings, possibly based on medieval tapestries. The central feature of the interior is the altar, which is possibly the most unusual feature of the cathedral. Henrik Sørensen's depiction of the resurrected Jesus Christ was inspired by a Nordic archetype. On the side panels Sørensen depicted the anxious mother and Hans Nielsen Hauge's awakening. The ceiling was painted by Arve Hagen. The pulpit and the bar in front of the sanctuary were carved by Anthon Røvik. The pulpit includes a depiction of Francis of Assisi.

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Address

Kirkegata 14, Hamar, Norway
See all sites in Hamar

Details

Founded: 1849
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ivan Gutovic (2 years ago)
Marianne Skrodal (2 years ago)
Andreas-Johann Østerdal Ulvestad (2 years ago)
Kyrkje som ser bra ut utan å vere prangande.
Anette Cecilie Bure (3 years ago)
Chris (3 years ago)
Wunderbarer Klang und bei Sonne ein ganz toller Ort. Wir waren begeistert, unbedingt besuchen !
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