Hamar Cathedral Ruins

Hamar, Norway

Bishop Arnaldur (1124-52) returned to Norway in 1150 from Gardar, Greenland and was appointed first Bishop of Hamar. He began to build the cathedral, which was completed about the time of Bishop Paul (1232-52). Bishop Thorfinn of Hamar (1278-82) was exiled and died at Ter Doest in Flanders. Thorfinn and many other bishops of the area disagreed with the sitting King Eric II of Norway regarding a number of issues, including episcopal elections. Bishop Jörund (1285-86) was transferred to Trondhjem.

In the aftermath of the Reformation in Norway, the structure was renamed Hamarhus fortress and made into the residence of the sheriff. The cathedral was still used but fell into disrepair culminating with the Swedish army’s siege and attempted demolition in 1567, during the Northern Seven Years' War. Swedish forces had launched attacks into Eastern Norway, capturing Hamar and continued towards Oslo. The Swedes later retreated, torching Hamar on their way, destroying Hamar Cathedral and Hamarhus.

Today the ruins of Hamar Cathedral form a part of the Hedmark museum (Hedmarksmuseet). The ruins of what remain of the Hamar cathedral, were originally built in Romanesque architecture and later converted to Gothic architecture. The distinctive arches in the cathedral ruins are covered in one of the most ambitious construction projects of its kind undertaken by the Norwegian government.

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Address

Strandvegen 98, Hamar, Norway
See all sites in Hamar

Details

Founded: 1150
Category: Ruins in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mari Aalstad (21 months ago)
Hamardomen/domkirkeruinene er et yndet sted for konserter og er åpent for de som besøker museet der syngende guider av og til byr på minikonserter. Anbefaler alle turister å besøke dette stedet. Dersom man besøker stedet når klokka er hel, vil man få servert lyden fra klokkespill som ligger like i vannkanten ved Hamardomen.
Danuta Witecy (2 years ago)
Very nice historical place
Oliv O. (2 years ago)
Ein sehr schönes Eckchen dieser Welt. Man sollte sich Hamar angeschaut haben, wenn man mal in Norwegen ist. Die Stadt ist sehr idyllisch am See gelegen. Es ist sehr sauber und ruhig. Die kleinen Wege führen einen rund um die Stadt und um den See.
Lilian Klingenberg (2 years ago)
De ruïne ligt in een park aan het water. Om de domkirke en de nederzetting te bezoeken moet je entree betalen en je kunt er een rondleiding volgen, het park kun je vrij bezoeken. De ruïne van de kerk bevindt zich in een glazen overkapping. Alles zeer de moeite waard.
陈新明 (3 years ago)
It's beautiful.
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