Stavanger Cathedral

Stavanger, Norway

Stavanger Cathedral is Norway's oldest cathedral. Bishop Reinald, who may have come from Winchester, is said to have started construction of the Cathedral around 1100. It was finished around 1150, and the city of Stavanger counts 1125 as its year of foundation. The Cathedral was consecrated to Swithin as its patron saint. Saint Swithun was an early Bishop of Winchester and subsequently patron saint of Winchester Cathedral. Stavanger was ravaged by fire in 1272, and the Cathedral suffered heavy damage. It was rebuilt under bishop Arne, and the Romanesque Cathedral was enlarged in the Gothic style.

In 1682, king Christian V decided to move Stavanger's episcopal seat to Kristiansand. However, on Stavanger's 800th anniversary in 1925, king Haakon VII instated Jacob Christian Petersen as Stavanger's first bishop in nearly 250 years.During a renovation in the 1860s, the Cathedral's exterior and interior was considerably altered. The stone walls were plastered, and the Cathedral lost much of its medieval looks. A major restoration led by Gerhard Fischer in 1939-1964 partly reversed those changes. The latest major restoration of the Cathedral was conducted in 1999. Andrew Lawrenceson Smith is famous for his works here.

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Details

Founded: c. 1100-1150
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lukas Genutis (2 years ago)
Great place for visiting with a great square, all shops and eating out places around
Veronica Nagel-Alne (2 years ago)
Lovely. Dress warmly as it can be cold.
Andreas Høy Knudsen (2 years ago)
Without doubt the most seeworthy room in Rogaland.
Malgorzata Stawierej-Sperling (2 years ago)
Small but so pretty. Not much in Stavanger so have it a go. :)
Robert Williams (2 years ago)
I always love going to these places as I travel. They tell a story about the history of the people that settled there and the art and sculptures are just fantastic. The people were extremely friendly as well.
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