Austre Åmøy Rock Carvings

Austre Åmøy, Norway

In Austre Åmøy, specifically at the Meling farm, you can find the largest concentration of rock carvings in Rogaland. There are several fields in the area, with both large and small rock carvings. The largest petroglyph fields are prepared and signposted to the public, while the smaller fields are not accessible to visitors.

On sloping rocks lies artwork carved by human hand 2000-3000 years ago. In Austre Åmøy there are around 1000 figures registered over a distance of about 1 km, divided into 10 fields. The petroglyphs were created in the Bronze Age and the early Iron Age. The carvings show a cult where the sun was an animating factor. People from Rogaland carved ships, sun symbols, human figures and many other designs.

The ships appear in several variations and none of the ships carvings are exactly alike. The ship was an important religious symbol throughout the Bronze Age, interpreted as the symbol of all that was holy and full of power, while it was a means of transportation to the sun and the divine in all spheres.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1000 BC - 0 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Norway

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Morten Landa (2 years ago)
Beautiful place
Lester Garry (3 years ago)
Beautiful place
Mikael Kindberg (4 years ago)
First time on Åmøy, beautiful place by the sea.
Sabrina Dickinson (5 years ago)
Lovely place
Tone Ragnhild Rosnes (6 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Church of St Donatus

The Church of St Donatus name refers to Donatus of Zadar, who began construction on this church in the 9th century and ended it on the northeastern part of the Roman forum. It is the largest Pre-Romanesque building in Croatia.

The beginning of the building of the church was placed to the second half of the 8th century, and it is supposed to have been completed in the 9th century. The Zadar bishop and diplomat Donat (8th and 9th centuries) is credited with the building of the church. He led the representations of the Dalmatian cities to Constantinople and Charles the Great, which is why this church bears slight resemblance to Charlemagne"s court chapels, especially the one in Aachen, and also to the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna. It belongs to the Pre-Romanesque architectural period.

The circular church, formerly domed, is 27 m high and is characterised by simplicity and technical primitivism.