Stunner was a Stone Age settlement located in Ski. The settlement was first discovered in 1928 when a farmer, Johannes Mikkelsen harvested potatoes. Mikkelsen was a knowledgeable man and recognized the flint tools. More than 700 pieces of flint and other stone artifacts has been found at the site.

The flint finds from the Stone Age settlement at Stunner reveal that the site was populated around 11000 years ago. Pioneer settlers from the Ahrensburg culture tracked from the submerged North Sea continent and European mainland. Their primary prey was reindeer. At Stunner however, marine resources have been significant. The landscape the settlers encountered was dramatically different to the present. The sea level was 160 m higher, and the fauna and flora resembled the arctic tundra and coastline.

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Siggerudveien 720, Ski, Norway
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Founded: 9000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Norway

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