Fana Church history is long and complicated. Historians assert that the church has been rebuilt and enlarged several times. Fana Church was mentioned in writings for the first time in 1228, when Pope Gregory IX released a conscription to the vicar and brothers at 'the holy cross church and hospital in Fana'. Parts of the existing church building are from the Romanesque age, and the walls show signs of there having been a stone building at the site, most likely a church, before 1220. Due to this, it is believed that the core of the church was built in the second half of the 12th century.

The legend 'The Holy Silver Cross' is connected to Fana church. In 1626, when the king gave professor Worm at Copenhagen University commission to register all historical objects and occurrences in Bjørgvin bishopric, Skonvig, the son of a priest, sent a letter about the legend. Two fishermen found a silver cross at Korsnes in Korsfjorden, and they tried to get the cross on land near Milde. However, the cross was too heavy to carry, so they knew the cross was meant for Fana. When they arrived at Fanahammeren, the cross was easy to carry. They brought it to the church where it was settled at the altar. One of the fishermen was blind, but when he touched the cross and scratched his eyes he gained sight again. The story about the healing cross reached many, and pilgrims visited the church hoping to be healed. It is said that at a small knoll close to the church there was a lot of crutches and canes that pilgrims had left behind after having been healed at the cross. According to the legend, the priest in Fana burned 6 horse loads of crutches in 1546.

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Address

Fanavegen 320, Fana, Norway
See all sites in Fana

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tor Are B. Ellingsen (16 months ago)
Nice people to talk to
Linn Kavita Lønningen (2 years ago)
Baptized and confirmed in Fana Church! Now in 2020 I will probably go to Søreide. But, I know where I live and I know what I think. I guess I can visit Søreide church as well, but Fana Church is closest to mine mitt and my father ?. But he passed away in 2009, and I go where I want. Faith has no municipal boundaries.
kristel ika (2 years ago)
great!
Antonio Romao (Rockaoke Norge) (3 years ago)
Amazing building/church and fantastic congregation
N Dahl (3 years ago)
Beautiful old architecture and the gardens are kept very well too.
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