Bergen Cathedral

Bergen, Norway

Bergen Cathedral was first time mentioned in 1181. It retains its ancient dedication to St. Olaf. During the reign of king Haakon IV of Norway, a Franciscan friary was established near the church, then known as Olavskirken, or the church of Saint Olaf, which was incorporated in it. The church burned down in 1248 and again in 1270, but was reconstructed after both fires. In 1463, it burned down again, but this time it was not reconstructed until the 1550s, despite being declared the cathedral in 1537.

After the fires of 1623 and 1640, Bergen Cathedral received its current general appearance. The steeple on the nave was torn down, and the current tower was built. During the renovation in the 1880s by architect Christian Christie, the Rococo interior was replaced to give the interiors back their former medieval appearance.

A cannonball from the 1665 Battle of Vågen between the English and Dutch fleets remains embedded in the cathedral's exterior wall. The present organ at Bergen Cathedral, by Rieger Orgelbau, is from 1997. The organ is the fifth one in the cathedral's history; the first known organ was installed in 1549.

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Details

Founded: 1181
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea Casappa (2 years ago)
Very beautiful church, if you are in Bergen you MUST visit this cathedral!
Javlon Juraev (2 years ago)
Magnificent
Carpusher VVu (2 years ago)
Still under maintenance.
ade0410 (2 years ago)
Afraid this wasn't open when we visited but it looked a lovely place from the outside. There was a lot of building/renovation work going on though. Hope to come back and see it inside and out when all the work is finished. Sure it'll be worth it.
Marisa Borg Grech (2 years ago)
A bit poor on the inside but beautiful on the outside complete with graveyard
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