St. John's Church

Bergen, Norway

St. John's Church was built between 1891 and 1894 in the Gothic Revival style. With 1250 seats, it is the largest church in Bergen.

In 1888, an architectural contest was conducted for the design of a new church. It was built from drawings by architect, Herman Major Backer (1856–1932). The frescoes in the Church's ceiling date from 1924 and were completed by Hugo Lous Mohr (1889-1970). The building process was first lead by architect Adolf Fischer and from 1891 by Hans Heinrich Jess. The church was consecrated in 1894.

The organ was built by Schlag and Sohn of Wurttemberg. It was modernized by JH Jørgensen of Oslo during 1967. The altarpiece depicts Christ in prayer and was designed in 1894 by Marcus Grønvold. The church tower is the highest in the city at 61 metres. The main tower has four stair towers and a carillon. It was designed by Verein Bochum in Bochum, Westphalia.

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Address

Sydnesplassen 5, Bergen, Norway
See all sites in Bergen

Details

Founded: 1891-1894
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lukasz Salamon (9 months ago)
Very interesting structure placed in beautiful surrounding with some nice architectural gems of norwegian design.
Claudio Alejandro Canales Chacana (12 months ago)
Beautiful views of the mountains surrounding Bergen city.
Monica “FREJA” Romano (15 months ago)
Very beautiful place ?
martin Nganwuchu (2 years ago)
Beautiful from the outside but close to tourist due to Covid-19
Liviu Pop (2 years ago)
Must visit in Bergen
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