Church of Archangelos Michail

Pedoulas, Cyprus

The church of Archangel Michael is situated in a central area of the Troodos mountain range, in the valley of Marathasa, in the village of Pedoulas. In 1985 it was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List which includes nine other painted Byzantine churches of the Troodos range. According to the dedicatory inscription above the north entrance, the church was built and decorated with frescoes in 1474, with the donation of priest Vasilios Chamados. The priest, accompanied by his wife and two daughters, is depicted above the dedicatory inscription, offering Archangel Michael a model of the church.

This church belongs to the typical single-aisled, timber-roof type of the Troodos region. The narthex, which extends to its south and west side, was used as a loft due to the small size of the church. The loft was used by the women, while only men entered the main church.

The church of Archangelos Michail is one of the few churches in Cyprus which preserves the name of the artist who decorated it. His name was Minas and he was a local painter who came from the area of Marathasa. Minas was a typical “naïve” painter with a conservative style, and followed the Byzantine tradition. However, he was aware of the artistic trends of his time and place which explains the influx of western elements in his work. During this period many contemporary churches were decorated with wall-paintings of the same style.

The wooden templon screen is worth mentioning, which also dates to 1474, with painted decoration consisting of coats-of-arms. It is one of the best-preserved examples of the kind in Cyprus. On the epistyle one can notice the painted coats-of-arms of the medieval Kingdom of Cyprus. Next to it is the double-headed eagle, the emblem of the Palaiologan dynasty, the last kings of the Byzantine Empire.

Only a few metres to the west of the church of Archangelos Michail, in a specially arranged room of the old primary school, a collection of portable icons and other objects of mainly religious art are kept. These come from the Byzantine churches of the village of Pedoulas, and are dated from the 13th to the 20th century.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

E912, Pedoulas, Cyprus
See all sites in Pedoulas

Details

Founded: 1474
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

More Information

www.mcw.gov.cy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ted Eckman (10 months ago)
A small church that is semi difficult to get to. It’s a long drive up from the coast and the town where the church is located has very tiny roads. Best to avoid if your rental car is large. The paintings inside are nice. If you like to see old small churches, then this may be up your alley. If not, or if you prefer the architecture of churches, then this might be one to skip.
Amit Chowdhury (5 years ago)
Quaint little place to stay for a few days. The grapes are awesome. Pretty walks, great food; just the place to chill undisturbed.
Angelique Kieser (5 years ago)
Beautiful old churches make up this UNESKO heritage site! It is wonderful to stroll through the village and find them hidden between the houses! Some have beautiful frescos inside! Realy worth a visit! There is a lot to see in Pedoulas and the weather in the summer is great!
Dario Morandotti (5 years ago)
Very tiny but beautiful painted church. Looks like is not guarded but always open. Park in the street on the main road and walk down 200 m the village. The church is on the right, a bit unnoticeable a part the UNESCO plate, in front of the bigger Bizantinr Museum.
fadi hrimat (5 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror (Topographie des Terrors) is an outdoor and indoor history museum. It is located on Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, on the site of buildings which during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945 were the headquarters of the Gestapo and the SS, the principal instruments of repression during the Nazi era.

The buildings that housed the Gestapo and SS headquarters were largely destroyed by Allied bombing during early 1945 and the ruins demolished after the war. The boundary between the American and Soviet zones of occupation in Berlin ran along the Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, so the street soon became a fortified boundary, and the Berlin Wall ran along the south side of the street, renamed Niederkirchnerstrasse, from 1961 to 1989. The wall here was never demolished.