House of Dionysos

Paphos, Cyprus

The House of Dionysos is a rich Greco-Roman type building where the rooms were arranged around a central court, which functioned as the core of the house. It seems that the house was built at the end of the 2nd century AD. and was destroyed and abandoned after the earthquakes of the 4th century AD. The House of Dionysus occupies 2000 square metres of which 556 are covered with mosaic floors decorated with mythological, vintage and hunting scenes. The magnificent mosaic decorations and the mythological compositions are the main characteristics of this restored Roman villa and it is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Paphos.

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Details

Founded: c. 190 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

The War Kettle (20 months ago)
Great day out
Sue Hill (20 months ago)
Great archaeological site
Piers Lewis (2 years ago)
This was the best value for money. Easy access for disabled, free parking close to entrance and toilet facilities on site. This is a large site that includes The House of Aion, Orpheus, Theseus and Achille, Then a large building that covers and allows access to House of Dionysos. Each has amazing mosaics that have been well preserved. You can see the outline of the buildings and the rooms and the details provided for the individual areas is very clear. The layout of the walkways is very clever allowing access and views to most areas of the site while protecting the more vulnerable areas. you don't feel restricted. This covers a decent size area and is easy to miss things if you are not aware of what the site covers. We spent a few hours here, but could have spent longer.
Shona Haggerty (2 years ago)
This was a fabulous experience best done in the early morning as the heat of the day makes it rather uncomfortable would recommend as a must see and only €4.50 for hours of informational experience
Ieva Mikosa (2 years ago)
The House of Dionysus occupies 2000 square metres of which 556 are covered with mosaic floors decorated with mythological, vintage and hunting scenes. The magnificent mosaic decorations and the mythological compositions are the main characteristics of this restored Roman villa and it is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Paphos.
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