Kerzerho Megaliths

Erdeven, France

There are 195 megaliths in Kerzerho, aligned east to west. They extend over 200 metres in 5 rows. Dating from between 5,000 to 2,000 BC, they have of course suffered over the years. In fact only a few centuries ago there were 1130 stones in 11 rows: the structure must have been 2 kilometres long by 65 metres wide.

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Details

Founded: 5000 - 2000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

More Information

www.megalithic.co.uk

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas McCrory (4 years ago)
Great for all fans of the Neolithic anthat .
Djredcat123 (4 years ago)
Some rocks. No charge to park or look round. A few good short walks through the stones. Not sure we saw them all though due to pretty poor signage in French (and nothing in English)
Billy Wallace (4 years ago)
This historical site has amazing energy. The positive karma was very surreal. It filled me with peace and serenity. I felt like I had time traveled through a wormhole. Like the tv show Outlander. Waves of calm washed over me. The local guide Kate Masters told me the ancient druids possibly used local psychedlic mushrooms and henbane type flora to dance with the stones in ancient rituals. I played some clannad and enya Celtic music while here.
Yoann Le Teuff (4 years ago)
Great rocks of impressive size, good parking space, but very little information on the site. Left wanting.
Mike Osborne (4 years ago)
Best to go off season so you can walk between the stones
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