Kosava castle is a ruined neo-Gothic castle built in 1830 by Graf Wandalin Puslowski. It is near the palace where Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko was born. The architect of the castle was Frantisek Yascholda. The ruined castle is similar to a replica of Tadeusz Kościuszko's house in Merechevschina. After the collapse of the January Uprising in 1863, ownership was transferred to the Trubetskoy family and other Russian aristocrats. During World War I and World War II, the place was severely damaged. Currently, the castle is in the process of restoration.

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Address

H699, Kosava, Belarus
See all sites in Kosava

Details

Founded: 1830
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belarus

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stanislau Skorb (2 years ago)
Beatiful palace. The museum is not so interesting, just some pictures and text, interior is not completed yet. Also there is a birthplace of Tadeusz Kosciuszko. Beautiful monument and park. Must see in Belarus.
Ivan Lapitski (2 years ago)
Good place to visit to learn history of Belarus
Mark Eaves (2 years ago)
This Palace was badly damaged in WW2 it has been rebuilt to original specs and has very good artifacts and information there about the original owners, nice surrounding area very beautiful... highly reccomended!!!
Jelizaveta Ross (2 years ago)
Interesting place with beautiful nature and unfinished castle reconstruction
Sergei Teresuk (3 years ago)
Nice historical site. Although it's good to keep in mind that people there mostly don't speak any other languages but Russian. Not many people know that there is also a WW2 jewish mass grave nearby the palace in the forest. For some reason local authorities don't mention it, last time I was there there was no even a small sign showing the way to the grave, unless you have already found it yourself.
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