Kinkelenburg Castle

Bemmel, Netherlands

The earliest mention of Kinkelenburg castle dates from 1403, when Johan van Ambe was lent 'a house and a homestead with waterways and moat at Bemmel'. The castle probably consisted then of a square stone tower-house (built around 1300), the foundations of which lie beneath the present building. Soon afterwards, the status of village castle was changed to the present 'Huis te Bemmel'. Kinkelenburg was converted in the 18th century into a stately manor. During WWII, the municipality commandeered the building as emergency accommodation for the damaged town hall in the Dorpsstraat. Kinkelenburg was the only big building in Bemmel that still had a watertight roof.

After the war, the municipality decided to remain here, but the ruined castle would first have to be restored. Despite its impressive history, the restorers found nothing more of historical interest than a few coins in the attic and a dented tin can in the ditch.

The interior now has beautiful wall panels, acquired for a nominal price from the Huize Heyendaal, Nijmegen, and originating from an Amsterdam canalside house. A ceiling painting by Hubert Estourgie (1924-1982) tells about the origin of the Betuwe region.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Castle Biker (13 months ago)
Hele mooie en unieke combinatie van een oud kasteel met daaraan vast een nieuw kasteel, eigenlijk totaal niet bij elkaar passend. Maar dat maakt het juist mooi. Je kunt er vrij omheen wandelen, er is geen hek of iets dergelijks.
Nicole Wiel (2 years ago)
Prachtige expositie.
Bert Meeuwsen (2 years ago)
Leuk
Henk Verkuijlen (2 years ago)
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