St. Eusebius' Church

Arnhem, Netherlands

St. Eusebius church is named after the 4th-century saint Eusebius, Bishop of Vercelli. On the site of the present building initially stood a church dedicated to St. Martinus but after some relics of St. Eusebius arrived in the town during the early part of the 15th century, it was decided to build a new church dedicated to the saint at the old site. This new structure gradually replaced the old building over the next century, commencing when Arnold, Duke of Egmond laid the first stone in 1452.

The church was extensively damaged during the Second World War following Operation Market Garden in 1944. When the battle over the bridge that crosses the Rhine occurred, between paratroopers under the command of British Lieutenant-Colonel John Dutton Frost and the Germans, the church was completely burnt out. Later the tower, weakened by the fire, collapsed entirely.

Following the war the church was restored between 1946 and 1961. It is no longer used for religious services but rather is a tourist attraction, specifically commemorating the bravery of the paratroopers of the Allied forces who attempted to isolate the Germans by capturing the bridge across the river Nederrijn.

In 1994 the municipality of Arnhem commissioned an elevator to be placed in the church tower. Visitors can pay a small fee and ride up the elevator past all of the array of bell and into the loft of the church, from where tourist binoculars or the naked eye can be used to survey a 360 degree view of the surrounding city.

Visitors are also able to enter the crypt below the building. This part of the building has only very dim light in a central part. By carefully exploring a number of darkened cavernous areas, most of which are either barred as if being a part of old gaol cells, or in some cases as clearly exhumed shallow graves, the visitor can find ancient human bones which have been left in the state of their burial or death.

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Details

Founded: 1450
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

eusebius.nl
www.archimon.nl

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amanda j (5 months ago)
Really cool church with lots of history. Plus terrifying glass observation boxes. Great views of Arnhem
Sean Hazlewood (8 months ago)
Enjoyed the visit to this iconic and humble place the glass floor and elevator real experience very interesting levels at top of building showing the varied events during and following the WW2 events of this special place thankyou
Francisco Almeida Vizentin (11 months ago)
The view from the glass balcony is quite nice. they also host concerts and plays which look and sound great in the church
Arnold Wentholt (13 months ago)
Beautiful church with an attractive tower, that both have been destroyed in WWII, and later restored (though not in its original state). Interesting presentation about the war, operation Market Garden (parachute landing of the allied troops) and the history of the tower. Interesting also for kids for the great views and glass platform.
Ikenna Ngene (2 years ago)
Lovely architecture especially when you consider how old it is. Apparently, this is the tallest church in Netherlands and having behind inside, I admit that it looks good. But the better part is that I went there for a Christmas service. The choir is awesome. If you've not heard them sing, make time and do so.
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