St. Eusebius' Church

Arnhem, Netherlands

St. Eusebius church is named after the 4th-century saint Eusebius, Bishop of Vercelli. On the site of the present building initially stood a church dedicated to St. Martinus but after some relics of St. Eusebius arrived in the town during the early part of the 15th century, it was decided to build a new church dedicated to the saint at the old site. This new structure gradually replaced the old building over the next century, commencing when Arnold, Duke of Egmond laid the first stone in 1452.

The church was extensively damaged during the Second World War following Operation Market Garden in 1944. When the battle over the bridge that crosses the Rhine occurred, between paratroopers under the command of British Lieutenant-Colonel John Dutton Frost and the Germans, the church was completely burnt out. Later the tower, weakened by the fire, collapsed entirely.

Following the war the church was restored between 1946 and 1961. It is no longer used for religious services but rather is a tourist attraction, specifically commemorating the bravery of the paratroopers of the Allied forces who attempted to isolate the Germans by capturing the bridge across the river Nederrijn.

In 1994 the municipality of Arnhem commissioned an elevator to be placed in the church tower. Visitors can pay a small fee and ride up the elevator past all of the array of bell and into the loft of the church, from where tourist binoculars or the naked eye can be used to survey a 360 degree view of the surrounding city.

Visitors are also able to enter the crypt below the building. This part of the building has only very dim light in a central part. By carefully exploring a number of darkened cavernous areas, most of which are either barred as if being a part of old gaol cells, or in some cases as clearly exhumed shallow graves, the visitor can find ancient human bones which have been left in the state of their burial or death.

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Details

Founded: 1450
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

eusebius.nl
www.archimon.nl

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monty Smith (9 months ago)
A great view of the city
Boris ter Beek (10 months ago)
The renovation was done really well. Overall a magnificent church
Kevin James van Duuren (10 months ago)
Beautiful place to visit and enjoy the beautiful historic heritage of Arnhem.
Nader Bou Faycal (14 months ago)
Great historical monument. It was exceptional to see someone playing on the organ, and listening to the sound of the heavenly music coming from the pipes. Also a small museum is inside. Taking the elevator to the top was a nice experience. And once arrived to the top you get a great view of Arnhem, you can see clearly the John Frost bridge, the Airborne Museum 'Hartenstein', ...
Ingmar Delsink (15 months ago)
I highly recommend to go and see the view of the Eusebius Church tower. It's just beautiful.
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