Haukipudas Church

Haukipudas, Finland

The first church in Haukipudas was probably built in the Middle Ages and it was located to the Kello village. The church or chapel was mentioned in the letter dated back to the year 1488 (found from the Vatican archives of Pope Innocent VIII).

The present wooden cruciform church was completed in 1764. It is designed by Matti Honka and built by Jaakko Suonperä. Originally Haukipudas church was named as Ulrika’s Church. Interior of the church is very richly decorated by paintings of Mikael Toppelius (1774-1779).

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Details

Founded: 1762-1764
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

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Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

toni anttila (2 years ago)
Mahtava
Kari Petter Jokela (2 years ago)
Kaunis Kirkko, kauniilla paikalla!!!
Kyyläri (2 years ago)
En käy kirkossa mutta hieno paikka näin kirkoksi.
katja-anjuska iskulehto (2 years ago)
Todella hienot maalaukset ja ystävällinen henkilökunta.
Miia Aunola (3 years ago)
The paintings were beautiful, and the experience itself was really cozy. If you visit Haukipudas (nobody will do it), quick visit here wont hurt
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