Wijenburg was an important castle in the Duchy of Guelders and the Lords of Echteld who lived in the castle enjoyed great prestige until there was a disagreement between the Duke of Guelders and Lord Otto van Wijhe in 1492. At the beginning of the 20th century, the castle was saved from demolition by Baron Van Verschuer and restored by Stichting Geldersche Kasteelen national heritage foundation.

The history of Wijenburg Castle dates back to the 12th century, when a fortified tower was built and the castle has been extended further and further over time. For centuries, the castle was occupied by the extensive and influential Van Wijhe family. By around 1400, the castle had grown into one of the most important political centres in the Duchy of Guelders. Duchess Catharina, the wife of Duke Willem van Gulik, was even godmother to one of the descendants of the Van Wijhe family.

In 1492,Otto van Wijhe had a disagreement with the newly-appointed Duke, Charles of Guelders, after he had sided with Charles’ arch-enemy, the House of Burgundy. Otto was taken prisoner and even tortured; his castle was set on fire, the moat was filled in and he was deprived of his most important noble rights. His grandson, Otto, managed to redeem the family’s name to some extent: he studied law and became Lord of Echteld in 1568. As if by a miracle, one of his diaries has been preserved along with two friendship books. These give us a fascinating insight into life in a 16th-century castle.

The castle remained in the Van Wijhe family (by marriage) for many years. In 1928, the two elderly ladies Anna and Wil van Balveren sold the castle to their nephew, B.F. Baron van Verschuer. In 1956, the Baron handed the castle over to Stichting Geldersche Kasteelennational heritage foundation, which carefully renovated the by-then dilapidated castle and restored it to its former glory. The castle is now known as one of the most popular wedding locations in Gelderland.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Derya Adiyan (5 months ago)
Amazing wedding venue, currently also serving special dinners. Top quality service and food.
Stefano Carulli (2 years ago)
What a gorgeous place! Such a well preserved castle. It really feels like going back in time from the moment you step in. i was there for a photo shoot and the staff was very friendly; I would definitely recommend this place for a party or wedding! Only downside is that it is a bit hard to reach!
Anouk van Emmerik (2 years ago)
Mooie sfeer, aan alle details gedacht. Vriendelijk personeel, mooie trouwlocatie!
Edwin van de Graaf (3 years ago)
Als fotograaf hier ook top behandeld tijdens een hele dag huwelijk. Fijne professionele medewerkers. Daarnaast een schitterende plek voor een feestje. Als het aan mij ligt kom ik zeker terug.
Wouter Knol (3 years ago)
We are considering a divorce, just to be able to get married here again! Definitely the best wedding venue in the country. The building has many possibilities and different atmospheres. The staff is open to all your wishes and will do their best to make your wedding the best day you can wish for. They will arrange a rehearsal, tasting dinners and much more to help you with preparations. The day itself will be amazing, guaranteed. Even afterwards, they'll invite you for memorial dinners and a glass of champagne at your first anniversary.
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Glimmingehus is the best preserved medieval stronghold in Scandinavia. It was built 1499-1506, during an era when Scania formed a vital part of Denmark, and contains many defensive arrangements of the era, such as parapets, false doors and dead-end corridors, 'murder-holes' for pouring boiling pitch over the attackers, moats, drawbridges and various other forms of death traps to surprise trespassers and protect the nobles against peasant uprisings. The lower part of the castle's stone walls are 2.4 meters (94 inches) thick and the upper part 1.8 meters (71 inches).

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On site there is a museum, medieval kitchen, shop and restaurant and coffee house. During summer time there are several guided tours daily. In local folklore, the castle is described as haunted by multiple ghosts and the tradition of storytelling inspired by the castle is continued in the summer events at the castle called "Strange stories and terrifying tales".