Wijenburg Castle

Echteld, Netherlands

Wijenburg was an important castle in the Duchy of Guelders and the Lords of Echteld who lived in the castle enjoyed great prestige until there was a disagreement between the Duke of Guelders and Lord Otto van Wijhe in 1492. At the beginning of the 20th century, the castle was saved from demolition by Baron Van Verschuer and restored by Stichting Geldersche Kasteelen national heritage foundation.

The history of Wijenburg Castle dates back to the 12th century, when a fortified tower was built and the castle has been extended further and further over time. For centuries, the castle was occupied by the extensive and influential Van Wijhe family. By around 1400, the castle had grown into one of the most important political centres in the Duchy of Guelders. Duchess Catharina, the wife of Duke Willem van Gulik, was even godmother to one of the descendants of the Van Wijhe family.

In 1492,Otto van Wijhe had a disagreement with the newly-appointed Duke, Charles of Guelders, after he had sided with Charles’ arch-enemy, the House of Burgundy. Otto was taken prisoner and even tortured; his castle was set on fire, the moat was filled in and he was deprived of his most important noble rights. His grandson, Otto, managed to redeem the family’s name to some extent: he studied law and became Lord of Echteld in 1568. As if by a miracle, one of his diaries has been preserved along with two friendship books. These give us a fascinating insight into life in a 16th-century castle.

The castle remained in the Van Wijhe family (by marriage) for many years. In 1928, the two elderly ladies Anna and Wil van Balveren sold the castle to their nephew, B.F. Baron van Verschuer. In 1956, the Baron handed the castle over to Stichting Geldersche Kasteelennational heritage foundation, which carefully renovated the by-then dilapidated castle and restored it to its former glory. The castle is now known as one of the most popular wedding locations in Gelderland.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

More Information

www.kasteelwijenburg.nl

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jane Flagg (2 years ago)
Gorgeous setting. Great food.
Marijana Vidakovic (2 years ago)
Wonderful place for relax,walk,and celebrate wedding or party?
Dennis van Bommel (3 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful wedding location. The service was great and very helpful with completing all our master of ceremony tasks. The bride and groom had a beautiful room inside the castle to spend the night after the party! Well maintained castle, from inside and outside! Well reachable by car with an own free of charge parking place. Room for a nice walk around the castle as well!
Derya Adiyan (4 years ago)
Amazing wedding venue, currently also serving special dinners. Top quality service and food.
Stefano Carulli (5 years ago)
What a gorgeous place! Such a well preserved castle. It really feels like going back in time from the moment you step in. i was there for a photo shoot and the staff was very friendly; I would definitely recommend this place for a party or wedding! Only downside is that it is a bit hard to reach!
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