St. Peter's Church

Utrecht, Netherlands

The Pieterskerk (St. Peter's Church) is one of the oldest in Utrecht. Its construction began in 1039 and it was inaugurated on 1 May 1048 by Bernold, Bishop of Utrecht (although the lost west towers were probably only finished about a century after the inauguration). Characteristic of the Romanesque style in which it is built are the church's large nave pillars, each hewn from one piece of red sandstone, and the crypt under the choir. The building is now used by the Walloon Church.

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Details

Founded: 1039-1048
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Vergeer (12 months ago)
Prachtige grotendeels Romaanse kerk die tijdens de restauratie prachtig hersteld is, waarbij voormalige katholieke elementen weer zichtbaar gemaakt zijn. Teruggevonden (onder de vloer) uit de bouwtijd stammende beeldhouwwerken zijn weer terug geplaatst. Mooie crypte, muurschilderingen die weliswaar aangetast zijn, maar toch weer zichtbaar gemaakt. Werkelijk een juweel in de Utrechtse binnenstad in een nog zichtbare, voorheen ontoegankelijke imuniteit. Het bezoeken meer dan waard.
Guus Dodemont (12 months ago)
Mooi gebouw wordt gerestaureerd, Momenteel in gebruik voor TV opnames. Onder andere tv programma, van onschatbare waarde. Voor omroep MAX.
Ahmed Al-Ammouri (2 years ago)
It was nice
Edgar Here and There (2 years ago)
Well worth a visit
Pieter van der Valk (3 years ago)
The oldest church in Utrecht. Rich history. The church is now a welcome location for concerts. Take your time to look at all the details and visit the garden. And thank the congregation of this l'Eglise Wallonne for taking care of the church so well.
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