Electoral Castle

Eltville, Germany

The Electoral Castle is Eltville's landmark and was built in 1330 by Balduin von Trier on the ruins of a castle destroyed during the Tariff Wars ('Zollkriege'). Construction was completed in 1350 by Heinrich von Virneburg. During the 14th and 15th centuries, the castle was the residence of the archbishops and electors of Mainz. In 1635, the entire property, except for the living tower (“Wohnturm”), was destroyed by Swedish troops. Only the east wing was rebuilt in modified form in 1682/83.

The Gutenberg exhibition in the tower pays tribute to the famous inventor of letterpress printing, who was officially honored here in 1465, the only time during his life. Today it invites visitors to wander through the courtyard, castle moat, and beautiful rose garden.

Many festivals und cultural events take place here throughout the year. The castle can be rented as a unique location for your private events such as weddings and family celebrations as well as for business meetings and seminars etc.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1330
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.eltville.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

bronwyn fabrie (19 months ago)
Really pleasant historical place to enjoy along the Rhine!
George (2 years ago)
Visited this place in winter and it could be nicer
Paul Maritz (2 years ago)
The gardens in spring and summer are beautiful!!
Leonardo Campos de Melo (2 years ago)
The place has beautiful gardens, and a lot of dolls. It's not bad, but not cool either. Would recommend only if you have spare time.
Ria Margari (2 years ago)
Splendid! I always visit the tower since it is a wonderful place to relax and enjoy the view.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.