Electoral Castle

Eltville, Germany

The Electoral Castle is Eltville's landmark and was built in 1330 by Balduin von Trier on the ruins of a castle destroyed during the Tariff Wars ('Zollkriege'). Construction was completed in 1350 by Heinrich von Virneburg. During the 14th and 15th centuries, the castle was the residence of the archbishops and electors of Mainz. In 1635, the entire property, except for the living tower (“Wohnturm”), was destroyed by Swedish troops. Only the east wing was rebuilt in modified form in 1682/83.

The Gutenberg exhibition in the tower pays tribute to the famous inventor of letterpress printing, who was officially honored here in 1465, the only time during his life. Today it invites visitors to wander through the courtyard, castle moat, and beautiful rose garden.

Many festivals und cultural events take place here throughout the year. The castle can be rented as a unique location for your private events such as weddings and family celebrations as well as for business meetings and seminars etc.

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Details

Founded: 1330
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.eltville.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

bronwyn fabrie (17 months ago)
Really pleasant historical place to enjoy along the Rhine!
George (2 years ago)
Visited this place in winter and it could be nicer
Paul Maritz (2 years ago)
The gardens in spring and summer are beautiful!!
Leonardo Campos de Melo (2 years ago)
The place has beautiful gardens, and a lot of dolls. It's not bad, but not cool either. Would recommend only if you have spare time.
Ria Margari (2 years ago)
Splendid! I always visit the tower since it is a wonderful place to relax and enjoy the view.
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