St. Peters Church

Bacharach, Germany

St. Peters Church dates back to 1094, but the current building was founded in the 12th century. It has been restored and rebuilt a number of times over the years, but the main. Inside are many original furnishings and items from centuries ago. Also inside you will find the tomb of Johann Friedrich von Wolfskehl from 1609.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.agermanyattraction.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sanja Solomun (9 months ago)
Eine schöne Kirche, leider nicht so oft geöffnet.
Łukasz Nita (2 years ago)
I share all positive opinions. The church is very picturesque. So is the entire town.
Sergei B. (2 years ago)
Not too special, but worth a glance if happened to be there.
Neil Gilmour (4 years ago)
A beautifully restored and maintained church in a beautiful and fun little city. Just plan delightful!
SFC Airborne (4 years ago)
We were married in St. Peter's today. The church is beautiful, historic and well maintained. I cannot say enough wonderful things about the Paster and his daughter two of the friendliest people we could ask for to perform our ceremony. The Paster took the time to speak slower than normal (for my benefit) due to German is my second language and my wife's first. Thank you and may God be with you both.
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