Septfontaines Castle is one of the castles belonging to the Valley of the Seven Castles. It is not clear when the first castle was built in Septfontaines. In 1192, there is a reference to someone by the name of Tider who was Lord of Septfontaines. In 1233, Jean de Septfontaines placed the property under the protection of Countess Ermesinde of Luxembourg. At the beginning of the 14th century, Thomas de Septfontaines, a friend and companion of Emperor Henry VII, was the lord of the castle. In 1600, Christoph von Criechingen built a huge Renaissance tower at the northern entrance. In 1779, a fire destroyed the castle which increasingly fell into ruin. In 1919, the castle was partly demolished but in 1920 the owners attempted to carry out restoration work but unfortunately did not pay much attention to historical architectural requirements. Today the castle is privately owned and cannot be visited.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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3.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

The Lp Player (11 months ago)
Ech hunn eng gutt Iddi fir d'Buerg, awer ech weess net, wien ze kontaktéieren.
Dennis van Bakel (2 years ago)
Niet te bezoeken of te bezichtigen. Geen informatie bij de burcht. Onder constructie, maar zo te zien al sinds lange tijd.
Volodymyr Cherkas (2 years ago)
Closed castle, looks like forgotten and careless.
Bohler Livo (2 years ago)
Ok
Tibor BALAZS (2 years ago)
Egy zárt vár. De nagyon szép környezet. Un château fermé. Mais dans une belle environment.
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