Septfontaines Castle is one of the castles belonging to the Valley of the Seven Castles. It is not clear when the first castle was built in Septfontaines. In 1192, there is a reference to someone by the name of Tider who was Lord of Septfontaines. In 1233, Jean de Septfontaines placed the property under the protection of Countess Ermesinde of Luxembourg. At the beginning of the 14th century, Thomas de Septfontaines, a friend and companion of Emperor Henry VII, was the lord of the castle. In 1600, Christoph von Criechingen built a huge Renaissance tower at the northern entrance. In 1779, a fire destroyed the castle which increasingly fell into ruin. In 1919, the castle was partly demolished but in 1920 the owners attempted to carry out restoration work but unfortunately did not pay much attention to historical architectural requirements. Today the castle is privately owned and cannot be visited.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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Jérôme Gollier (5 months ago)
Climbing up there while on the 2022 "Velosummer" wasn't an easy task. Especially when pulling a 5 year old along. On the post at the bottom of the city, the castle is said to be private property and thus not opened for visits. However, some local autochtone told us it was for sale...
António Vicente (7 months ago)
In really bad condition
Joana Souto (8 months ago)
Beautiful place to walk ?
Chris Reţe (12 months ago)
When have I visited this place?
Hasan Shaikh (2 years ago)
Was closed when today 22 may 2021
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