Ostrobothnian Museum

Vaasa, Finland

The museum's function comprise the coastline and northern area of the former Vaasa province. The collections relate to both peasant and upper-class culture, the history of the town of Vaasa and Ostrobothnia. There are for example the coin collection of Mauritz Hallberg, the Hedman collection of visual and industrial art from different countries, mostly Dutch and Italian, the oldest dating from the 15th century. The Finnish art collection is from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Terranova-Kvarkens Nature Centre is also located to the same building. It exhibits fauna and geology of the Kvarken area, the landrising and the ice age, information in nature tourism and contacts also information in the Forest and Park Services, virtual aquarium, natural history collections of Ostrobotnia Australis, Wildlife Nature Film Festivals.

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Address

Museokatu 3, Vaasa, Finland
See all sites in Vaasa

Details


Category: Museums in Finland

More Information

museo.vaasa.fi
www.museot.fi

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olivia Kilppari (2 years ago)
I was there with my class and we had fun
Lassi Valve (2 years ago)
A very impressive and large museum with a wealth of informstion on the history, nature anf life in Ostrobothnia. A treasure for orthonologists.
Diana Carolina Aldana (2 years ago)
Beautiful and adapted for a nice experience for families or schools. I loved it.
Andrea Nezbedová (2 years ago)
Nice place, looks small from outside but is big when you go inside. Has multiple parts about more that just one area - history, nature, geography, local history... Has a nice small shop with cafeteria
Payal Bhattacharya (2 years ago)
Its a beautiful place to visit...
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