Korsholm Castle Ruins

Vaasa, Finland

Korsholm Castle was a medieval castle in Vaasa. It was probably built in the 1370s and the oldest record dates back to 1384 (the testament of Bo Jonsson Grip, where the castle was called as Krytzeborg). The castle was originally built to a small island and it was surrounded by a moat and two walls. The castle itself was probably built of wood.

In the Middle Ages Korsholm was a property of several nobles. The most famous of them was Sten Sture the Older. In 1748 the new governor house was built to the site and all medieval structures were demolished. The next house was built in 1851 but it was destroyed by the great fire of Vaasa in 1852. Today a low mound is all that remains of the castle. There is also a monument dedicated to the castle.

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Address

Korsholmankatu 2, Vaasa, Finland
See all sites in Vaasa

Details

Founded: 1370s
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yasaman Malmir (2 years ago)
The beautiful place ?
Mike Heath (2 years ago)
Imagining how it used to be before the fire and whilst the ships could still dock, is easy with the sketch provided on the information board. There is also a well shown but no information about what happened to it. There is a bell tower without a bell and not much tower, but it can be imagined.
Olli Karjalainen (2 years ago)
Couple of small ruins with info tables. Otherwise services are limited to a small grocery shop nearby.
Pontus Holmgren (2 years ago)
Vaasa was founded here year 1606 but the city was destroyed by a fire year 1852. The city was then moved 7km away to where it is located today. If you visit Vaasa and if you got free time then stop by to see the history of this beautiful city.
Bao Pham (3 years ago)
There was not much to see.
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