Korsholm Castle Ruins

Vaasa, Finland

Korsholm Castle was a medieval castle in Vaasa. It was probably built in the 1370s and the oldest record dates back to 1384 (the testament of Bo Jonsson Grip, where the castle was called as Krytzeborg). The castle was originally built to a small island and it was surrounded by a moat and two walls. The castle itself was probably built of wood.

In the Middle Ages Korsholm was a property of several nobles. The most famous of them was Sten Sture the Older. In 1748 the new governor house was built to the site and all medieval structures were demolished. The next house was built in 1851 but it was destroyed by the great fire of Vaasa in 1852. Today a low mound is all that remains of the castle. There is also a monument dedicated to the castle.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Korsholmankatu 2, Vaasa, Finland
See all sites in Vaasa

Details

Founded: 1370s
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jonna Sheya (19 months ago)
Beautiful place and will written information about the ruins and the time they were built in Finnish, Swedish as well as in English. Easy to find and close to the city centre if you have a car at your disposal. I think there's also a bus going there but we visited on a cold day and took the car therefore. Open entry, meaning no fee and no fences so they can be accessed 24/7.
Tomáš Titěra (2 years ago)
Well-preserved ruins of a church, a school and other buildings of the old city. All the necessary information are provided on information boards in Finnish, Swedish and English. The city seems to know how to properly protect its heritage.
Jim Lyons (2 years ago)
Ruins of Vaasa. Very interesting and the signs have an English option.
Demetra Strateva (2 years ago)
Well preserved church, good park, could not find the museum.
Tom Elzholz (2 years ago)
Great location with a lot of Information boards to learn something about the history of this place.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.