Vaasa City Hall

Vaasa, Finland

Vaasa City Hall was designed by Swedish architect Magnus Isæus and it was completed in 1883. The Senate of Finland moved to the city hall during the Civil War on 16.3.1918. The Senate worked there until 3.5.1918 when the war ended and Senate moved back to Helsinki.

Today the City Hall is used for events of local communities, companies and the city of Vaasa.

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Address

Raastuvankatu 26, Vaasa, Finland
See all sites in Vaasa

Details

Founded: 1883
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko M (10 months ago)
Sisällä ei ole tullut käytyä (kun yleensä Vaasassa käynnit ovat ajoittuneet viikonloppuihin), mutta jo ulkoisestikin rakennus on hyvin tyylikäs.
Jari Sundman (10 months ago)
Vaasan kaupungintalo sijaitsee Vaasan Senaatinkadulla. Talon rakentamisesta päätettiin vuonna 1875 kun kaupunki oli myynyt 1864 C.A.Sterbergin piirtäjän raatihuoneen kouluksi 1872. Kaupungin piti rakentaa uusi hallintotalo viiden vuoden sisällä joka pariin kertaan lykkääntyi. Rakennuksen piirsi tukholmalainen arkkitehti Magnus Isaeus ja talo valmistui 1883. Taloa on myös käytetty pitkään myös paloasemana, sekä erilaisissa kulttuuritapahtumissa. Tyyliltään talo edustaa lähinnä uusbarokkista tyyliä. Itsenäisen suomen senaatti toimi Vaasan maaherran tiloissa 30.01.1918 ja muutti sittemmin Vaasan kaupungintalon tiloihin 16.03.1918 alkaen aina 3.5.1918 saakka jolloin se muutti Helsinkiin.
jarmo kovanen (12 months ago)
Oskar Śniegowski (16 months ago)
Very classy place.
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