Mustasaari Church

Vaasa, Finland

Mustasaari (Korsholm) Church was originally built for the Court of Appeal between 1776 and 1786, and designed by Carl Fredrik Adelcrantz. After the city, including the church, burnt down in 1852, the building was rebuilt as a church under the direction of Carl Axel Setterberg, who worked as a county architect for the county of Vasa.

The church is the most significant sample of early Gustavian style in Finland. It has been influenced by the Neoclassical architecture used in the France and Italy in the mid-18th century.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1776-1786
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Abismal Harmony (2 years ago)
Beautiful church in a very quiet and peaceful area.
Peter Saramo (2 years ago)
Rakennustaiteen muistomerkki. Kirkkona järkyttää Ristin korvaaminen vapaamuurarien silmäsymbolilla.
Zackarias Böckelman (2 years ago)
One of Osthrobotnia's most beautiful churches. Though I have been working with the congregation for a few years on and off I haven't actually visited the inside too many times. Every time I do go inside it's a delight as the arcitecture and colours are stunning. If you are looking to visit some of the churches of Osthrobotnia this is a must! En av Österbottens vackraste kyrkor. Jag har jobbat med Korsholms svenska församling i flera år under olika projekt men har inte varit inuti kyrkan allt för många gånger. Så varje gång jag faktiskt är det, tycker jag att det är en häpnadsväckande upplevelse. Arkitekturen och färgerna är vackra så om du har planer på att besöka några av Österbottens kyrkor är det här ett måste!
Kaarlo1972 (2 years ago)
Swedish church
Tuomas Kallio (4 years ago)
Beautiful building to see, also surroundings are nice.
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