Although the official date of the Dussen castle’s establishment was during the 13th century, there was likely a fortified house on the property long before the present-day castle. The castle’s dungeon was built in 1330 by John VI of Heusden and in 1387, permission was granted to extend the modest keep into a real castle. In 1418, the castle was passed down to Arent’s son. Just three years later, the castle would be severely damaged by St. Elizabeth’s flood. Parts of the towers and a few of the basements were the only that remained of the original structure.

It would be 50 years before the castle would be restored to its former glory. After exchanging hands a few times, it would be Jan van der Dussen V that would eventually rebuild the castle between 1473 and 1474. After his death, the castle was passed down to his son, Floris II van der Dussen. Floris then passed the castle down to his son, Jan van der Dussen VI, but he would die childless. The castle was then put in the hands of Jan’s sister Cornelia. During the next two hundred years, the castle would be remodeled in Tuscan style and also have a west wing added. Both towers were also improved.

In the early 1900s, a chapel was added. In 1931, the castle was put up for sale with plans for the structure to be demolished. The municipality stepped in, purchased the property and began restoration work. Unfortunately, the castle would become severely damaged in 1944 during World War II. In 1980, renovations were once again performed.

Today, Dussen Castle serves primarily as an event venue, but guided tours are offered by the Friends of Castle Dussen Foundation. Information on touring dates, hours and costs can be found on the Friends of Castle Dussen Foundation website. The castle is still surrounded by its original 14th century moat and includes three residential wings that surround the courtyard. While not available to tour, the vaulted cellar dates all the way back to 1387.

Weddings and business meetings are the most popular events held at the castle. The castle can accommodate up to 300 guests and the castle’s staff can also help with the planning process. Dussen Castle offers a complete package, with catering available for both small and large events.

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Address

Binnen 1, Dussen, Netherlands
See all sites in Dussen

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angelo Blasutta (20 months ago)
Unfortunately closed therefore no visit inside. Outside is nice.
Wybren Grijpma (2 years ago)
Beautiful
georginamgo (2 years ago)
Nice castle, well maintained by the municipality for marriages, etc. The castle is rather small so it can be seen in an hour max. Tower was open exceptionally and it is certainly worth a visit. Not much explanation on the history of the castle and not a single sign in English.
Trung Nguyen (2 years ago)
Lovely venue and great atmosphere.
Adam Forgacs (2 years ago)
Cozy castle, cafe place. Great place for wedding photos as well for sure! :)
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