The original Schaloen castle was built in 1200 as a defensive fortress commissioned by the family Van Hulsberg. The remains can still be seen in the vaults of the present castle. Schaloen was an almost square building with on each corner two massive buttresses and guerite tower in the hood. The outbuildings were in the original castle on the right side of the main building.

Nevertheless the castle almost completely burnt down by war in 1575. In the year 1656 the reconstruction of the castle was completed, which can still be seen on the date which is formed by the wall anchors into the left when completed construction. In 1718 the magnificent gatehouse and current access bridge were erected, and in 1721 came to a gardener's and a carpenter's house ready and also a covered parking for coaches.

At the end of the 19th century, Count d' Villers - Masbourg Eclaye, through his marriage became a member of the family Van Hulsberg, commissioned architect PHJ Cuypers to give the castle a new view. In 1894, the renovation was completed. Until 1934, the Van Hulsberg inhabited the castle. In the Second World War Schaloen also proved attractive for the Germans. Result was that the castle was completely looted and was left uninhabitable. In 1968 the castle was sold out of lack of money.

After years of further abuse and looting the current owners, family Bot, bought in 1985 the castle and related buildings and restored them as a hotel.

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Founded: 1656
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacintha Walters (3 years ago)
Had an amazing stay! Really loved this place and the scenery is very cosy and romantic. Bit pricey but definitely worth the money.
Luísa Cortat Simonetti Gonçalves Coutinho (3 years ago)
Only the service is not that good. But the view certainly makes up for it!!! And I surely recommend the cheese plate.
Sofiane Guitoun (3 years ago)
What a nice to see castle . You can also eat and drink and what a feeling I recommend it Wat mooi kastle kan ook eten een drinken
Eugene Theunissen (3 years ago)
Great first look on our wedding day
Bruce Stacey (6 years ago)
What a lovely place to walk or ride. With a cafe for lovely food and drinks. They even have rooms to rent.
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