Valkenburg Castle Ruins

Valkenburg, Netherlands

In the year 1115, fortifications were erected at the site by Gosewijn I, Lord of Valkenburg. This original wooden keep survived until 1122 when it was destroyed under siege by Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor. The castle was rebuilt in the following centuries but was again destroyed in a siege, this time by Jan III, Duke of Brabant. The current ruins are those of the castle rebuilt in the 14th century.

The castle was blown up during the Franco-Dutch War, in 1672, by the army of King-Stadtholder Willem III to prevent it falling into French hands.

References:
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Founded: 1115
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Israel Manzo (4 months ago)
IN LOVE with lofe #tomtom #bridgestone #KLMcrew & also with #maastricht #belgum #Limburg & #beer
Antonio Colin Navarrete (8 months ago)
interesting to know more about this castle, which was mostly destroyed. the entrance fee I found it expensive. if you have a museumkaart then its for free
Trang Đài (8 months ago)
Nice place for sightseeing, only Castle in the NL
wout veelenturf (10 months ago)
Beautiful site with great views on valkenburg and surroundings. However, the castle, and also information signs and castle models are not what they could be. It does not look like the ruin is being preserved, plants are growing into the stones which could destroy what remains of the old walls. Next to that, signs and models are faded by the sun. All of this while an apparently large sum of money is spent on the presentation of the castle to attract new customers (for instance the large modern glass entrance and restaurant). It would be nice to see more money put into the preservation and presentation of the castle itself. To end on a positive note: it is still a very interesting site to visit and I would recommend doing so.
Ralph van Roosmalen (11 months ago)
It is nice. Especially when you realize this one of the few castles in the Netherlands that was on a hill. Despite they blew up the castle, it is still possible to imagine how it looked in the 17th century.
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