The Sint-Lambertuskerk was built between 1914 and 1916 and named after the Maastricht-born saint Lambert. At the time of its completion, it was the first church outside the old city wall. The church was designed by Hubert van Groenendael in neo-Romanesque style on a cruciform plan. The church was initially operated as a Roman Catholic parish church.

Soon after its completion in 1916, subsidence cracks developed in the structure. Ten years later, the church was restored and no further damage occurred until 1970. Beginning in 1970, portions of the structure began to sag and new cracks developed. Since 1985, the church has no longer been in use.

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Founded: 1914-1916
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chios Apostolos (2 years ago)
Very beautiful church!!
Abhishek Singh (Harsh) (3 years ago)
Looks beautiful and surrounding is also quite beautiful.
Gaëlle Robin Vanderbauwhede (3 years ago)
looks nice from the outside
Plamen Popov (3 years ago)
Unfortunately the church was closed and I was not able to enter, but the architecture is great and very impressive.
Carlos Dominguez (4 years ago)
Esta iglesia es la primera construída fuera de la muralla. Eso se debe, en parte, a que es relativamente moderna, comparada con las otras, y se ubica en una parte más moderna de la ciudad. Fue construída alrededor de 1915, y su nombre se debe al santo Lamberto, nacido en esta ciudad. Hubert van Groenendael la diseñó en estilo neorrománico en una planta cruciforme. Es muy interesante de ver, aunque se encuentre algo alejada del centro histórico.
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